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With the Promise of Audio over IP (AoIP) Fully Realized, Telos Systems Helps Broadcasters Carry High Resolution Broadcasts ‘Anytime, Anyplace, Anywhere’

Greg Shay, Chief Science Officer of Telos Alliance, Describes the Birth of Livewire and How the Industry Has Finally Embraced AoIP Nearly Twenty Years Later

CLEVELAND, September 22, 2014: Greg Shay, Chief Science Officer at Telos, began working on Audio Over IP (AoIP) 18 years ago in order to help the professional audio community close the loop on a pressing challenge: moving large amounts of audio data more efficiently, while retaining sonic quality and integrity. After joining Telos Systems in 1996, Shay worked with Steve Church and Frank Foti of The Telos Alliance to make Audio AoIP a reality, combining the company’s unique technology achievements with existing state of the art switches and network-ing solutions from companies like Cisco.

Greg_Shay_webThe result was a watershed breakthrough for radio broadcasters in 1999 with Telos’ Livewire solution. This enabled end users to dramatically reduce cabling and I/O points, while retaining pristine audio quality and facilitating easier management of their systems infrastructure — which often consisted of anywhere between 100 and 1,000 channels of audio. While it was a long road of innovation, Telos succeeded in solving a widespread industry problem — now, the company estimates that Livewire is present in more than 5,000 broadcast studios around the world. Greg Shay was a key architect of Livewire and an important stakeholder in the development of AES67, the AoIP interoperability standard that was published by the Audio Engineering Society (AES) in September of 2013. In the following interview, Shay describes the breakthroughs and nearly ubiquitous adoption of AoIP.

How did your work on AoIP begin?

My work on AoIP predates my coming to Telos, which was 18 years ago. I developed ‘Digital Audio Work Station’ (DAWS) in the late 1980s and early 1990s as part of a company that was eventually acquired by Euphonix. In the early 1990s, you had this interesting work problem of multiple people in separate control rooms working with DAWS, but no real solution for sharing work among them. So the whole problem of audio networking came about and this planted the seed of how can we move large amounts of audio back and forth by just using the network.

How did the discussion of leveraging the network infrastructure come about?

Livewire_BadgeWhen I first came to Telos and met Steve Church and Frank Foti in 1996, my very first conversa-tion with Steve Church was about this new thing Audio over IP. We thought, wouldn’t it be great if we could do all this audio I/O on the hardware that already exists on computer device plat-forms? Of course back then, network speeds were slow: 10MB was considered fast, and the industry wasn’t very mature so it was a lot harder. So we always had it on our back burner and began waiting for the right opportunity and context of a solution while working on the develop-ment of what would become Livewire. This was about 1998, and we got our patents filed in 2002. Since then, Livewire has been very successful — there have been approximately 5,000 studios built with the technology so far, and many of these include very large ones around the world. In the radio market, it is a leading technology.

When and why did you really see the broad market adoption occur?

Early adopters went ahead and started using it around 2003, because it delivered efficiencies but also saved costs. We were able to outfit many studios because our solution helped end-users minimize required cabling — there was much less I/O involved because you were leverag-ing all that computer horsepower. Then the hump period was around 2005 when the broader adoption occurred. All of the sales were based on specific problems that were being solved. It’s hard to convince people to buy a new product when it is more expensive, but since Livewire saves costs and brings technology innovation, it became much easier.

Our solution had lots of features and worked really well, and setting up installations became so fast. It is very analogous to hooking up computers; the difference of having 100 computers in a building and trying to hook them all up with RS 232 cables and a switching box versus just plug-ging it into the network and it’s done. We got that same kind of efficiency, because a typical radio station facility has hundreds of audio channels — the biggest ones have thousands. The sheer logistics of organizing and dealing with that many audio channels delivers unprecedented econ-omies of scale and along with it, cost savings.

What were some of the ways you were able to manage your own risk in develop-ing Livewire?

From the very beginning, the technology strategy — and this is something that Steve Church was just great at -— was the realization that radio on the whole is a relatively small industry, so let’s not try to do all of our own R&D and not reinvent the wheel. Let’s figure out how to leverage what the giants have done already. So we ended up hitching our wagon to the billions of dollars of R&D the big networking companies had. We had to figure out many things that were never done before, but all the while leveraging these bigger technologies. We accomplished this, and to me, this is the number one reason we’ve been successful. In developing Livewire, we made a num-ber of good technology choices that blossomed and matured over the 12 years.

Where do you think some of the future evolution is going to happen?

I believe the telecommunication companies will eventually lay down more fiber, and we are just riding on that progression and evolution. When we developed Livewire, we chose to use stand-ard IP networks formats — so our equipment is future proof and will work on these huge networks once they are deployed. This is where the real payoff will come on the decisions we made while developing Livewire, and it is also the huge problem that many of our competitors will face who made different choices. I have been giving whitepapers about this particular transition happening inside the studio, which will essentially open them up to the whole world. Interconnectivity is coming, but the missing piece is the telcos have to interconnect more cities with fiber. This is going to happen though. The power of networking will mean that the physical location of where people are and where the equipment is doesn’t matter much anymore. We are already seeing that happen in various ways. There is always going to be a human being at a microphone, be-cause of course it is all about the content. How you get that content to interested listeners how-ever, is up for grabs in terms of the technology.

About Telos:

For three decades, the companies of The Telos Alliance have revolutionized radio and television audio technology. Our goal is to help our clients, from global networks to local stations, produce better programming to improve audience engagement and ratings.

The companies of The Telos Alliance – Telos Systems, Omnia Audio, 25-Seven Systems, Axia Audio and Linear Acoustic – develop game-changing technologies and products that raise the bar for quality and innovation in the radio and television industries.

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Powersoft to Present on Advanced Subwoofer Design and its Patented M-Force Loudspeaker Technology at 137th AES Convention

Moving Magnet Linear Motor Technology in Subwoofers Can Deliver Greater Conversion Efficiency and Sound Quality in the Lower Frequency Ranges

Los Angeles, September 22, 2014: Powersoft, a world-leading manufacturer of professional power amplifiers, announced that it will present working methodologies and loudspeaker application scenarios on its patented M-Force linear motor technology, which was introduced at the 136th AES Convention in Berlin [A Novel Moving Magnet Linear Motor: Convention Paper 9060, by Claudio Lastrucci]. The presentation will take place on Friday, October 10th between 2:00 p.m. and 4:30 p.m., and explores applications such as cabinet design using new, electro-dynamic transducers based on a moving magnet linear motor instead of a traditional moving coil.

motorassemblyThe presentation, which will be conducted by Mario di Cola of Audio Labs Systems and Claudio Lastrucci — who both co-authored a new paper for this session — will demonstrate the practical use of M-Force linear motor technology with full measurement results. In the paper presented at the 136th AES, Claudio Lastrucci, Research and Development Director at Powersoft, articulated the benefits of this new technology, including improved conversion efficiency and sound quality in the lower frequency range as well as significantly lower distortion. Additionally, moving magnet technology offers considerably increased power handling, enabling it to reproduce upper bass frequencies with unprecedented level of quality and output. The presentation is open to all AES convention badge holders.

Who:
Mario di Cola, Audio Labs Systems and Claudio Lastrucci, Powersoft

What:
AES Paper Session: P9-4 Subwoofer Design with Moving Magnet Linear Motor

When:
ventedboxdesignFriday, October 10th, 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 pm.

Where:
AES 137th Convention, Los Angeles Convention Center — Room to be announced

To obtain a copy of A Novel Moving Magnet Linear Motor: Convention Paper 9060, please contact the AES online or request to The Audio Engineering Society, 60 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10165.

About Powersoft:

Powersoft is the world leader in lightweight, high power, single rack space, energy efficient amplifiers for the professional audio market. Founded in Italy in 1995, headquartered in Florence, Italy, with offices in Ventura, CA, Powersoft couples the experience and precision of its production department with exceptional components to deliver products with perfect audio response and high performance reliability. Its state-of-the-art amplifiers can be found in an array of markets, ranging from stadiums, sporting arenas, theme parks, performance venues and airports to convention centers, churches and clubs, and are used by the world’s leading tour sound companies. For more information, visit the Powersoft website @ www.powersoft-audio.com.

Image Captions:
1) Moving magnet linear motor assembly with polymeric 30″ diaphragm
2) High output, high quality vented cablnet design

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Sennheiser’s Esfera wins IABM Design and Innovation Award

IABM D&I Awards Winner finalOld Lyme, CT, September 17, 2014: Sennheiser’s Esfera surround microphone system has been recognized with an IABM Design and Innovation Award. At the awards ceremony held on September 13th during the IBC in Amsterdam, the audio specialist received the award within the Audio category.

“We feel extremely honoured that the IABM’s independent panel of experts has selected Esfera for the Audio award,” said Claus Menke, Head of Portfolio Management Pro for Sennheiser’s Professional Division. “Immersive audio is one of our focus areas, an area which truly creates a difference for the viewers’ TV experience. Esfera makes the lives of broadcast professionals a lot easier. The system enables them to efficiently capture authentic ambience using just two audio channels, and to convert this audio information to 5.1 at any point in the workflow, whether live or in post-production.”

The Esfera surround microphone system:

IABM AwardThe Esfera system consists of the SPM 8000 two-channel microphone unit and the SPB 8000 processing unit. The microphone unit features the typical advantages of RF condenser microphones: natural and detailed sound, transparency, ruggedness and high resistance to adverse climatic conditions. The processing unit uses an algorithm perfectly matched to the microphones to generate a 5.1 surround signal with sampling rates of up to 96 kHz. An integrated compressor ensures a broadcast-friendly signal. For ease of operation, the processing unit uses four directly selectable presets. These can be modified via an Ethernet interface to adapt to local conditions, including the settings for the gain of the individual channels, front and surround focus, surround delay, rotation, filters and cut-off frequencies, compressor, make up gain, output gain, limiter and windshield compensation.

About the IABM:

Sennheiser_Esfera_systemThe IABM, is the authoritative voice of the broadcast and media technology supply industry worldwide. Its wide range of services to members encompasses market research and intelligence, training, expert representation at standards bodies and broadcasting unions, executive networking opportunities, and preferential purchasing. A presence at every major broadcast tradeshow, the IABM also provides a valuable channel for communication among broadcast manufacturers, government, and regulatory bodies. Additional IABM activities include awards programs for innovation and scholarships designed to stimulate the development of the broadcast and electronic media industries on an international basis. For more information, please visit www.theiabm.org.

About Sennheiser:

The Sennheiser Group, with its head office in Wedemark (Hanover Region) is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. In 2013 the family company, which was founded in 1945, realised a turnover of around 590 million euros. Sennheiser has more than 2,500 employees worldwide and operates its own factories in Germany, Ireland and the USA. The company is represented worldwide by subsidiaries in France, Great Britain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Lichtenstein, Germany, Denmark (Nordic), Russia, Hong Kong, India, Singapore, Japan, China, Australia and New Zealand, Canada, Mexico and the USA, as well as by long-term trading partners in many other countries. The company Georg Neumann GmbH, Berlin (studio microphones and monitor speakers) and the joint venture Sennheiser Communications A/S (headsets for PCs, offices and call centres) are also part of the Sennheiser Group. You can find further up-to-date information about Sennheiser online at www.sennheiser.com.

Image captions:
1: Sennheiser’s Claus Menke (l.) accepting the award from Peter White, CEO of IABM

2: Immersive surround sound and workflow efficiency: the Esfera 5.1 surround microphone system, consisting of a two-channel microphone unit and the 5.1 processing unit

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Sennheiser adds an interpreter console to its Tourguide portfolio

Old Lyme, CT, September 16, 2014: With the new SL Interpreter console, audio specialist Sennheiser expands its Tourguide conference and presentation system with a complete solution for controlling language interpreting channels.

SL_Interpreter_isofrontAs a self-contained unit for simultaneous interpreting, Sennheiser’s SL Interpreter brings together all the key functions of an interpreting console. When combined with the rack-mount SR 2020 Tourguide transmitter and Tourguide receivers for the audience, it delivers scalable language interpreting solutions that ensure simple installation and user-friendly operation.

“Whether you’re doing a small product presentation or an international conference with hundreds of participants, SL Interpreter will impress with its flexibility and ease of use,” explained Vanessa Jensen, Senior Product Specialist, Integrated Systems at Sennheiser.

In combination with the digital Tourguide 2020 receivers (available in both bodypack and stethoset versions), SL Interpreter creates an interpreting solution that is easy to operate and quick to install. For more demanding applications, SL Interpreter and Tourguide 1039 bodypack receivers are the best combination to ensure optimum speech intelligibility, even in environments with heavy RF traffic.

A flexible complete solution – ready in next to no time:

SL_Interpreter_backSL Interpreter handles the floor language plus one relay language. If more translations are needed, up to four interpreting consoles can be combined in order to provide simultaneous interpreting in up to four languages.

As usual, two interpreters can work at each SL Interpreter console, which enables them to take turns at interpreting. Each interpreter can individually adjust the audio settings directly at the console. In addition to controls for volume, treble and bass, the new Sennheiser interpreting console has a mute function and “cough” button to briefly mute the microphone. As a complete solution, SL Interpreter can be set up easily and quickly. All that is needed is to connect a headset (or a microphone and a pair of headphones) and the language interpreting solution is ready to use.

The Sennheiser SL Interpreter is available now.

The Sennheiser Group based in Wedemark near Hanover, Germany, was founded in 1945 and has gone on to become a leading manufacturer of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. Sales in 2013 totaled 590.4 million euros. Sennheiser employs more than 2,500 staff worldwide and operates plants in Germany, Ireland and the USA. The company has a worldwide network of subsidiaries in France, Great Britain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, Germany, Denmark (Nordic), Russia, Hongkong, India, Singapore, Japan, China, Australia and New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, and the USA. It also has long-established trading partners in other countries. Georg Neumann GmbH, Berlin, a maker of studio microphones and monitor speakers, and Sennheiser Communications A/S, a joint venture making headsets for PCs, offices and call centers, are also part of the Sennheiser Group. More up-to-date information about Sennheiser is available on the internet at www.sennheiser.com.

Captions:
1: The SL Interpreter console completes Sennheiser’s Tourguide portfolio

2: The new SL Interpreter console turns Tourguide into a genuine all-round talent

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MORE THAN 130 POWERSOFT AMPS AT CORE OF NEW BILLION DOLLAR SPORTS HUB IN SINGAPORE

E&E fulfills major AV integration on National Stadium site

Singapore, September 15, 2014: The dynamic new Singapore Sports Hub, constructed at an estimated cost of Just over $1 billion US dollars, has now opened on the site of Singapore’s former National Stadium in Kallang. With the newly constructed 55,000-capacity stadium as its centerpiece, offering spectacular views over the waterfront and Singapore city skyline, it also includes the 6,000-capacity OCBC Aquatics Centre, the 3,000-capacity Arena (scalable into six halls), the Water Sports Centre located along the Kallang Basin, and commercial areas for leisure, shopping and dining activities.

Construction began in 2011, and the following August, Electronics & Engineering Pte (E&E) won the contract for the full integration of the Event Sound System and HD giant screens. Working to an architectural and engineering design prepared by the consultants, they specified well over 130 of Powersoft’s premium 1U K-Series and Duecanali Series amplifiers to drive the various PA and sound reinforcement systems. They described the project as “probably the largest high-powered distributed audio system that E&E has ever worked on.”

The network design for the National Stadium audio transmission was extremely complex, involving switching via 40 Netgear Gigabit 1000 base network switches. The main racks are populated by no fewer than 70 Powersoft K10 amplifiers (capable of delivering a jaw-dropping 12000W into 2 ohms) and 26 K2 amplifiers, incorporating the company’s proprietary DSP+AESOP technology — offering fully integrated sound shaping and system management capabilities).

These are found in 16 air-conditioned racks up on the Catwalk where they power six EAW MQX speakers, 35 QX speakers and 48 SB528zP subwoofers to serve the entire stadium bowl. This is processed by Symetrix SymNet Edge DSP, while a PC runs Dante software control and patching.

The Catwalk location for the amp racks was determined at an early stage in order to minimize the cable runs to the speakers. This was logistically challenging in view of the available space. However, Gary Goh, Deputy Managing Director at E&E, acknowledged that despite the limited rackspace, the fact that Powersoft amplifiers output extraordinary power from just 1RU chassis made this possible. “To derive sufficient power from such compact real estate required the superior switchmode amplification technology of Powersoft’s K series, with its incredible power to weight ratio. It really helped to maximize the space efficiency,” he reports.

The audio distribution design was based on an amplifier network running AES inputs as standard and analog inputs as backups. The amplifiers are controlled and monitored via the Armonía Pro Audio Suite software and deliver EAW Greybox settings in the DSP to the loudspeakers.

Elsewhere, a similar network was constructed for the OCBC Arena, using Powersoft’s energy-saving Duecanali 2-channel installation series. Via Netgear 1000 base network switching, in Amp Room 1 22 x Powersoft Duecanali D3904 amplifiers were specified to power large quantities of EAW and Community loudspeakers at various levels in all six halls — with signal processing again carried out in SymNet Edge, with signal transport over Dante.

Operating on the same principle in the Aquatic Centre are a further 15 Powersoft Duecanali D3904 amplifiers populating Amp Rack 1 and 2 to power the EAW loudspeakers installed at the Catwalk to serve the swimming pool area and further column speakers, installed at pool side, to service the corridors.

The final deployment of Powersoft amplification is in the Water Sports Centre, which, like the other zones is fully featured with Netgear switching, Symnet DSP, full audio control/mixing and playback devices. Here, the final three Powersoft Duecanali D3904 can be found in the Amp Room driving three EAW speakers installed at the top tower of the Centre.

All of which will future-proof the new Singapore Sports Hub for years to come — ensuring on the one hand that the public address and voice alarm systems can be heard intelligibly while the line and live playback pack plenty of punch.

“The clients trusted us to deliver all their technological requirements and I am confident that we have succeeded,” concluded Mr. Goh.

About Powersoft:
Powersoft is the world leader in lightweight, high power, single rack space, energy efficient amplifiers for the professional audio market. Founded in Italy in 1995, headquartered in Florence, Italy, with offices in Ventura, CA, Powersoft couples the experience and precision of its production department with exceptional components to deliver products with perfect audio response and high performance reliability. Its state-of-the-art amplifiers can be found in an array of markets, ranging from stadiums, sporting arenas, theme parks, performance venues and airports to convention centers, churches and clubs, and are used by the world’s leading tour sound companies. For more information, visit the Powersoft website @ www.powersoft-audio.com.

About Singapore Sports Hub:
The centrepiece of the Singapore Sports Hub is the new 55,000-seat National Stadium. The retractable seating capability allows for flexible reconfiguration of the stadium’s bowl, making the National Stadium the only stadium in the world able to host rugby, cricket, football, athletics and concerts in one venue. The stadium’s retractable roof and energy efficient bowl cooling technology also represents the next stage in sustainable stadium design, providing athletes and spectators with a unique and comfortable environment. OCBC Arena consists of six halls over two levels that are designed to be scalable in size, and will cater to an array of indoor sports events for both National Sports Associations as well as the general public. This 1,000-3,000 capacity venue was designed for badminton, fencing, taekwondo, basketball, netball, volleyball, rhythmic gymnastics training and table tennis. OCBC Aquatic Centre is designed to cater to both the general public and elite athletes, and will be able to host community-run events to premier aquatic competitions. Planned for everyday use and flexibility to host international events, the OCBC Aquatic Centre will have the ability to add additional temporary seating and double its 3,000 permanent seating capacity to accommodate a variety of events. Water Sports Centre will have community and elite training facilities for aquatic enthusiasts of all levels. A 500 metre course will be mapped out on the water and a one kilometre course will be accessible from Marina Bay. Canoeing, kayaking and dragon boating can be enjoyed at the Water Sports Centre.

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Sennheiser launches Dante™ card for Digital 9000 wireless microphone system

Amsterdam, September 15, 2014: At IBC, audio specialist Sennheiser is launching a Dante™ card for the EM 9046 receiver, enabling its top-of-the-range Digital 9000 microphone system to be integrated into Dante™ audio-over-IP networks. Users can conveniently route the system’s high-definition audio data via Audinate’s Dante™ Controller.

EM_9046_DANWhen it comes to digital audio networking, Audinate’s Dante™ is among the leading solutions for live audio, broadcasting and installations. Dante™ works with existing network infrastructure using IP and Ethernet standards and offers hundreds of channels of high-quality audio. “This is what makes Dante™ so attractive for us,” says Claus Menke, Head of Portfolio Management Pro for Sennheiser’s Professional Division. “With the extension card, broadcast and live audio engineers now can easily integrate our best wireless microphone system into a Dante™ network and benefit from its exceptional sound.”

Digital_9000The EM 9046 DAN extension card is simply inserted into the expansion slot of the EM 9046 eight-channel receiver. Internally, the card features sixteen audio inputs to send the digital audio and command signals over the Dante™ network. Connection is via two Gbit RJ45 sockets that serve to establish two redundant network circuits or daisychain the signals. The card works with sampling rates of 44.1/48/88.2 and 96 kHz at a resolution of 24 bits. The EM 9046 DAN will be available from mid-October.

New Wireless Systems Manager software:

Sennheiser will also adapt its Wireless Systems Manager software to include a monitoring function for the Dante™ card. The new version 4.2 will also be available from October and will allow users to listen to and monitor the EM 9046’s Dante™ audio streams from any point in the network.

Visit Sennheiser at IBC, Hall 8, Stand No. D 50.

EM 9046 DAN includes license from Audinate Pty Ltd under U.S. patent number(s) 7747725, 8005939, 7978696, 8171152 and other patents issued, see www.audinate.com/patents.

About Audinate and Dante™
Dante™ is the digital audio networking solution of choice for over 155 professional audio manufacturers in the broadcast, live sound, commercial installed and conferencing markets. Audinate’s Dante solution builds on existing Internet (IP) and Ethernet net-working standards and offers a migration path to emerging standards like AES67. Dante networking replaces point-to-point cabling and matrix switching solutions offering hundreds of channels of high-performance audio, control and monitoring across existing network infrastructure. Installation and management is simplified through a unique combination of plug and play technologies, saving enormous installation and long-term ownership costs. Audio sources attached to any network port are available everywhere throughout the network with signal routing defined by software, not physical cabling. Audinate also offers a comprehensive set of interfacing options for PC and Mac equipment (Dante Virtual Soundcard and Dante PCIe card) enabling simple integration of existing software applications with the audio network.

About Sennheiser
The Sennheiser Group based in Wedemark near Hanover, Germany, was founded in 1945 and has gone on to become a leading manufacturer of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. Sales in 2013 totaled 590.4 million euros. Sennheiser employs more than 2,500 staff worldwide and operates plants in Germany, Ireland and the USA. The company has a worldwide network of subsidiaries in France, Great Britain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, Germany, Denmark (Nordic), Russia, Hongkong, India, Singapore, Japan, China, Australia and New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, and the USA. It also has long-established trading part-ners in other countries. Georg Neumann GmbH, Berlin, a maker of studio microphones and monitor speakers, and Sennheiser Communications A/S, a joint venture making headsets for PCs, offices and call centers, are also part of the Sennheiser Group.

More up-to-date information about Sennheiser is available at www.sennheiser.com.

Captions:
1) The EM 9046 DAN card simply slots into the Sennheiser receiver, enabling Digital 9000 to send uncompressed HD audio data over a Dante™ network
2) The Sennheiser Digital 9000 system

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As Aspen Music Festival Completes its 65th Successful Season, Neumann Is There to Capture the Warmth and Musical Glow

The Neumann M 150 Tube Microphone Puts Listeners Front and Center for Key Festival Performances, Broadcast on Public Radio

Aspen, CO, September 2, 2014: Since 1949, The Aspen Music Festival and School has been one of the most famous classical music festivals in the world and one of the most prolific, hosting more than 350 performances between June and August each year. The Festival, which features four in-residence orchestras where students play alongside faculty, is recorded each year and can be heard on American Public Media (APM), Colorado Public Radio and Aspen Public Radio. To faithfully capture every nuance of the performances, The Festival relies on several Neumann M 150 microphones at its principal venue: Benedict Music Tent.

NM1Festival performances are mostly orchestral in content and can range anywhere from small chamber ensembles (3, 4 or 5 musicians) up to over 100 musicians and a full choir on stage. Each year, the main microphone array at the Benedict Music Tent consists of a Decca tree with (5) Neumann M 150 Tube microphones placed in the center and arrayed across the stage.

“Our Neumann M 150s Tube microphones, which were a gift from the Sidney E. Frank Foundation, have been a staple of the Festival for a long time,” said Scott Burgess, Head Audio Engineer, Aspen Music Festival and School. “It is of paramount importance for us to capture every instance of what these incredibily talented students are doing onstage, and the M 150 lends a warm sound that makes the orchestra shine in all of our recordings and broadcast transmissions across the country.”

NM2Each performance in Benedict Music Tent, which has a capacity of roughly 2,000, is manned by the Festival’s audio staff, which consists of 14 advanced students and professionals. Burgess says that students on the audio staff come from many of the major recording institutions around the country. This year, the Festival exceeded its attendance projections, with many sold out performances among its three primary venues. The 2014 season concluded with a rousing performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, which was broadcast live to a vast listenership on public radio.

M 150 Tube w EA 170This year, the Neumann M 150s — which were chosen as the principle microphone several years ago in a ‘blind’ listening test versus microphones from the world’s leading manufacturers — were routed to Grace Design and Millennia Media preamplifiers situated in the catwalk of the venue before being converted by an RME AD/DA interface and subsequently routed to a Studer digital console in the control room. The team relied on several Sennheiser HD 600s for headphone monitoring, including at Front of House: “The HD 600s can be useful at Front of House since they sound great and are open air,” says Burgess. “They can be useful for hearing audio details while remaining aware of what is transpiring around you.”

While this is only Burgess’ second season, he says there is vast collective experience and wisdom to draw from, and that the Neumann M 150 plays an integral role in The Festival’s sound. “The Festival has been working these rooms for a long time and, and we are quite clear on what we want and how to get it. From this perspective, the Neumann M 150 delivers in every possible aspect.”

For further information please visit www.neumann.com.

About Neumann:

Georg Neumann GmbH, with its headquarters in Berlin, Germany, is well-known as one of the world’s leading manufacturers of microphones. The company, which was established in 1928, has a long track record of world-leading product designs and has been recognized with a string of international awards for its technology innovations. From 2010, Neumann offers this expertise in electro-acoustic transducer technologies to the studio monitoring market, and will provide optimum solutions to its customers in the areas of TV and radio broadcasting, recording, and audio productions. Neumann is now the perfect partner for both the input and the output of the audio signal path. Neumann has manufacturing facilities in Germany (microphones) and Ireland (loudspeakers), and is represented in over 50 countries worldwide by Sennheiser subsidiaries, as well as by long-term trading partners. Georg Neumann GmbH is a Sennheiser Group company.

About Sennheiser:

Sennheiser is a world-leading manufacturer of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. Established in 1945 in Wedemark, Germany, Sennheiser is now a global brand represented in 60 countries around the world with U.S. headquarters in Old Lyme, Conn. Sennheiser’s pioneering excellence in technology has rewarded the company with numerous awards and accolades including an Emmy, a Grammy, and the Scientific and Engineering Award of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

You can find all the latest information on Sennheiser by visiting our website at www.sennheiserusa.com.

Photo captions:
1) Five Neumann M 150 Tube microphones are used to record performances at the Benedict Music Tent

2) The Decca tree array at the Benedict Music Tent

3) The Neumann TLM 150 Tube microphone

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The Ultimate Sonic Journey: Mastering Engineer Maor Appelbaum Relies on the Sennheiser HD 600 As a Critical Listening Tool in Creating New Yes Album

The Sennheiser HD 600 Plays a Key Role in Delivering a Spacious, Detailed Sound Experience, Removing Sonic Barriers Between Artist and Listener

Old Lyme, CT, July 29, 2014: Since forming in 1968 and subsequently releasing more than 20 studio albums including classics like Fragile, Close to the Edge and Tales from Topo-graphic Oceans, Yes built its international success on the very foundations of progressive rock. Still very active as one of rock’s most influential bands, Yes recently opened their latest chapter of musical innovation with the release of Heaven & Earth. Produced by the legendary Roy Thomas Baker (Queen, David Bowie) and mixed by Billy Sherwood (Nektar, Motorhead), Los Angeles-based Mastering Engineer Maor Appelbaum got the call to put the finishing touches on the classic band’s latest sonic creation, keeping his Sennheiser HD 600 audiophile grade headphones close by.

Appelbaum, who runs Maor Appelbaum Mastering and works across a broad range of genres, chose to use the Sennheiser HD 600s as a studio reference tool to bridge the gap between album production and listener. Over the course of the project, he listened as both a technically minded professional and as a passionate music fan, with the ultimate goal of delivering an emotionally engaging listening experience. In the conversation that follows, Appelbaum discusses the ins and outs of mastering a modern day classic.

What is your role as mastering engineer?

I bring an objective ear to the process. Since I haven’t heard a project before, I can listen like a fan yet have control over the outcome. I am the buffer between what is created in the studio and what finally arrives to the listener’s ear. My ultimate goal is to help create a better, more emotionally engaging listening experience. Part of how I do this is through critical listening, which is evaluating how the music’s ‘feeling’ is presented from a frequency perspective. In making my evaluations and decisions, the tools I use are very important to me. For example, I have an excellent monitoring system with many sets of speakers so I can control how these frequencies are presented. I also use headphones to help me hear other details that might be missed by speakers.

How did you begin working on the new Yes album?

Billy Sherwood and I have collaborated on many albums together, and in the past two years I have mastered around 20 albums that he has worked on. He is very well known in progressive rock circles and we have a very good, longstanding relationship. One day he called me asked me to master the new Yes album and it was a great surprise. Once the mixes came in, I wanted to take them to the next level, while keeping the openness of the recording and all the dynamics in tact.

How can headphones help in the mastering process?

They are a great tool for checking the stereo spread and also evaluating low level details — which can consist of room tones, reverberation and other items. Speakers are important in helping evaluate the dimension in a production, but in most cases they are in front of you. On the other hand, headphones are essentially surrounding your head and can really help you figure out if your imaging natural or if it feels artificial.

When did you decide to rely on headphones in the process?

Once I figured out the processing chain that I wanted to use, I listened to the project on head-phones because I figured that listeners of this album would include audiophiles as well as people who enjoy listening to headphones — not just people who listen through earbuds and speakers. I think you always want to make sure that the product sits well with the clientele, and of course Yes has many fans that are bound to listen on headphones — both ‘old school’ fans who grew up with headphones and hi-fi systems and ‘new school’ fans who grew up lis-tening to music on computers. Today, music fans want to have a better production system, but portable — that’s why I think there is more sales of headphones than ever before.

Why were you drawn to the Sennheiser HD 600s?

A friend of mine bought a pair and he was really excited about them. He kept after me and I realized that if he was enjoying them that much, I should really give them a shot on the Yes project. It was the first time I bought anything sight unseen, solely on a recommendation. I got them, put them on my ears and said ‘Wow – these really sound good!’ I didn’t feel like they were hyped and they sounded very natural. They had all the detail I needed, and were very comfortable – which can be important over long sessions. Also, the frequency response was never piercing and didn’t fatigue me. I took them off, listened to my speakers, then put them on again and realized that the HD 600s sounded very close to my speakers — as much as a pair of headphones can.

What were your specific goals in mastering this album and where did the HD 600s play a role?

For this album, it was very important for me to hear a three dimensional sonic image — not just with speakers shooting straight at me. Using the HD 600s, I could hear the entire panoramic spread in great detail — it was very revealing. With speakers you can also hear this, but with headphones it is better because they sit right on your ear, there is nothing in between you and the music. On an album like this, where everything is very open, hearing things this way is very important and the HD 600s were perfect. They sounded like a nice pair of expensive, audiophile speakers, but on your ears.

Can you describe the overall design and form of the HD 600s?

The build quality is excellent. Its padding on the HD 600 is just right, and the tension is loose enough that you don’t feel an exorbitant amount of pressure your ear. Also, they are not too heavy, so you don’t feel like there is something bulky on your head. The cable is super flexible and the plug is robust. Overall, I love the sound quality and the HD 600 is very comfortable to work with. I am very impressed and I think I will be using them more and more.

About Sennheiser:

Sennheiser is a world-leading manufacturer of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. Established in 1945 in Wedemark, Germany, Sennheiser is now a global brand represented in 60 countries around the world with U.S. headquarters in Old Lyme, Conn. Sennheiser’s pioneering excellence in technology has rewarded the company with numerous awards and accolades including an Emmy, a Grammy, and the Scientific and Engineering Award of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

You can find all the latest information on Sennheiser by visiting our website at www.sennheiserusa.com.

Photo caption:

1) Maor Appelbaum, Mastering Engineer
2) The Sennheiser HD 600 headphone

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Invisible Cities: An Opera for Headphones Receives Emmy® for KCET Documentary of Landmark Headphone Opera Production

Multi-Part Sennheiser Sponsored Documentary Captures Emmy® For Best Entertainment Programming at 66th Los Angeles Area Emmy® Awards

Los Angeles, July 28, 2014: Audio specialist Sennheiser announced that Invisible Cities: An Opera for Headphones won an Emmy® Award for Best Entertainment Programming Saturday night during the 66th Los Angeles Area Emmy® Awards at The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in North Hollywood. Invisible Cities: An Opera for Headphones was commissioned by Sennheiser and produced by KCET, the leading independent public media organization serving Southern California, and The Industry, the L.A. based experimental opera company.

Invisible Cities: An Opera for Headphones [kcet.org/invisiblecities] was featured online and on-air last December in a multimedia series for KCET’s arts and culture series, Artbound. The series provided an exclusive, in-depth look at the artisitic and technological challenges that collaborators The Industry, L.A. Dance Project and Sennheiser faced in creating the world’s first large scale opera for wireless headphones. Yuval Sharon, Founder and Artistic Director of The Industry, contacted Sennheiser in early 2013 to help make the wireless opera production become a reality.

“The documentary of Invisible Cities would have not been possible without the collaboration of Sennheiser and its pursuit of artistic innovation, and the experimental vision and framework created by The Industry,” said Juan Devis, senior vice president, Content, Development & Production for KCETLink. “We are proud and humbled to have been a partner in this endeavor and explore the limits of public television.”

“Sennheiser is proud of to have commissioned KCET’s fabulous production of Invisible Cities: An Opera for Headphones,” commented Stefanie Reichert, director strategic marketing, Sennheiser. “Invisible Cities was the result of a visionary artistic collaboration among The Industry and L.A. Dance Project and Sennheiser, and KCET’s subsequent production captured the very essence of how technology and cutting-edge artistic vision drives innovation in the arts.”

Invisible Cities, written by Christopher Cerrone and based on the 1972 novel by Italo Calvino, took audience members on a multi-sensory journey through Los Angeles’ Union Station, where they experienced an operatic narrative consisting of live dance performance, orchestral music and dramatic dialog: all driven by wireless headphone technology.

About Invisible Cities:

Hailed by The Hollywood Reporter as a “signal cultural event” and “a delicate and beautiful opera” by The Los Angeles Times, Invisible Cities was a joint production by The Industry and L.A. Dance Project which premiered at Los Angeles’ historic Union Station and performed to sold-out audiences during its run in October and early November 2013. Based on Italo Calvino’s fantastical novel, the opera was composed and adapted by Christopher Cerrone, conceived and directed by The Industry’s founder and artistic director Yuval Sharon, with choreography by Danielle Agami. The production utilized wireless technology provided by Sennheiser, offering audience members headphones to hear the opera amid the normal “hustle and bustle” of the train stationís everyday life.

About KCET:

On-air, online and in the community, KCET plays a vital role in the cultural and educational enrichment of Southern and Central California. KCET offers a wide range of award-winning local programming as well as the finest public television programs from around the world. Throughout its nearly 50-year history, KCET has won hundreds of major awards for its local and regional news and public affairs programming, its national drama and documentary productions, its quality educational family and children’s programs, its outreach and community services and its website, kcet.org. KCET is a donor-supported community institution. For additional information about KCET productions, web-exclusive content, programming schedules and community events, please visit kcet.org. KCET is a service of KCETLink.

About Sennheiser:

Sennheiser is a world-leading manufacturer of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. Established in 1945 in Wedemark, Germany, Sennheiser is now a global brand represented in 60 countries around the world with U.S. headquarters in Old Lyme, Conn. Sennheiser’s pioneering excellence in technology has rewarded the company with numerous awards and accolades including an Emmy, a Grammy, and the Scientific and Engineering Award of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

You can find all the latest information on Sennheiser by visiting our website at http://www.sennheiserusa.com.

Image caption:
Juan Devis, senior vice president, Content, Development & Production for KCETLink accepts Emmy® Award for production of Invisible Cities: An Opera for Headphones

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Sennheiser and Full Compass to Co-Sponsor Recording Clinic Featuring Leslie Ann Jones of Skywalker Sound and Wolfgang Fraissinet of Neumann

Grammy® Award Winning, Veteran Sound Engineer to Illustrate Recording Best Practices, Fraissinet to Discuss Large Orchestral Microphone Choices and Techniques

MADISON, WI, July 28, 2014: Audio specialist Sennheiser and Full Compass Systems, a national leader in Professional Audio, Professional Video, A/V, Lighting and Musical Instrument sales, announced they are co-sponsoring a very special audio recording clinic on Thursday, September 11th at the Full Compass facility in Madison, WI. The event will feature renowned, Grammy® award-winning sound engineer Leslie Ann Jones, who will demonstrate recording techniques and best practices when recording in the studio; and Wolfgang Fraissinet, President of Marketing and Finance at Neumann, who will discuss microphone choice and techniques for recording large orchestras, among other topics.

During this very special event, every attendee will receive a complimentary pair of Sennheiser HD 439 On-Ear headphones. In addition, attendees have a chance to win one of two valuable giveaways: a Sennheiser MK4 large diaphragm studio microphone with shockmount and a pair of Sennheiser MOMENTUM On-Ear headphones.

Leslie Ann Jones:

Leslie Ann Jones, who is Director of Music Recording and Scoring with Skywalker Sound, has been a recording and mixing engineer for over 30 years. She began her career at ABC Recording Studios in Los Angeles in 1975 before moving to Northern California in 1978 to accept a staff position at the legendary Automatt Recording Studios. There she worked with such artists as Herbie Hancock, Bobby McFerrin, Holly Near, Angela Bofill, and Narada Michael Walden, and started her film score mixing career with “Apocalypse Now.”

From 1987 to 1997 she was a staff engineer at Capitol Studios located in the historic Capitol Records Tower in Hollywood. She recorded projects with Rosemary Clooney, Michael Feinstein, Michelle Shocked, BeBe & CeCe Winans, and Marcus Miller, as well as the scores for several feature films and television shows. In 2003, she was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Engineered Recording, Classical, and received a Grammy Award for The Kronos Quartet’s recording of Berg: Lyric Suite, which won Best Chamber Music Album. In 2012, she won a Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Classical for Quincy Porter: Complete Viola Works by Eliesha Nelson & John McLaughlin Williams.

Wolfgang Fraissinet:

Wolfgang Fraissinet, who will discuss microphone choice and techniques for orchestral recording, is President of Marketing and Finance at Neumann Headquarters in Berlin and serves as Chairman of the International Advisory Board of the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester located in Berlin. Since 2005, Fraissinet has been a producer of international music recordings, such as several masterpieces and symphonies from Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Bach, and Mozart. He has recorded a number of Jazz productions, which were produced both in Germany and the USA. He has also studied classical piano at the Berlin Conservatory.

Fraissinet joined Neumann in 1990 and shortly thereafter was appointed as General Manager for the global activities of Marketing and Sales at the company’s headquarters in Berlin. In 2010, Fraissinet added Neumann Studio Monitor Systems as a new business unit, which has since gained wide acceptance in the professional audio community, growing year over year since the launch of Neumann’s first studio monitor, the KH 120.

For more information on this very special event, visit the registration page at www.fullcompass.com/lajones. Seating is limited.

Sennheiser
Sennheiser is a world-leading manufacturer of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. Established in 1945 in Wedemark, Germany, Sennheiser is now a global brand represented in 60 countries around the world with U.S. headquarters in Old Lyme, Conn. Sennheiser’s pioneering excellence in technology has rewarded the company with numerous awards and accolades including an Emmy, a Grammy, and the scientific and engineering award of the academy of motion picture arts and sciences. For more information, please visit www.sennheiserusa.com.

Captions:
1. Leslie Ann Jones, Director of Music Recording and Scoring with Skywalker Sound
2. Wolfgang Fraissinet, President of Marketing and Finance, Neumann Berlin

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