Briefingroom

Mixonline Briefing Room

Archive by Hummingbird Media

Antelope Audio Eclipse 384 AD/DA Converter Brings Master-Quality Audio to Korn Frontman Jonathan Davis’ Road Rig

Korn shook up the rock world at the end of 2011 when the L.A.-based band released its tenth studio album, “Path of Totality,” featuring collaborations with a host of dubstep producers including multiple Grammy Award-winner Skrillex. Now, Korn frontman Jonathan Davis is doubling down on his recent statement that “North American dubstep is the new electronic heavy metal” through a side project, Killbot, and a solo project under his DJ name, J Devil, recording into a laptop on the road and in the studio, using Antelope Audio’s new Eclipse 384 converter, master clock and monitor controller.

Davis recently added the Eclipse 384 AD/DA converter in order to streamline his mobile production rig after spotting it on the Antelope Audio web site. The 384 kHz A-to-D/D-to-A converter is clocked using the same Oven Controlled Clock and 64-bit Acoustically Focused Clocking technology that is implemented in Antelope Audio’s renowned Trinity Master Clock. The Eclipse 384 offers additional features conducive to mobile production applications, including two dedicated headphone amplifiers and a custom USB interface, as well as two large peak meters on the front panel. In order to simplify operation, users can create up to five custom presets of favorite setups via the system’s OS X- and Windows-compatible software control panel that may then be recalled from the Eclipse 384’s front panel.

“This is all I’ve got now; I used to have racks of stuff,” says Davis, who records vocals, guitar and bass into an Apple MacBook Pro through a signal chain comprising little more than the Antelope Eclipse 384, an API Channel Strip and a Shure microphone. “It’s basically my studio all in one box. It’s the best interface I’ve used. I love that everything is right there,” he says of the Eclipse.

Davis, who has been performing DJ sets using the moniker J Devil, is a longtime aficionado of electronic dance music (EDM), and has been producing dubstep-influenced remixes for rock and electronic artists for several years. Having started creating EDM on his laptop “for fun,” Davis has now teamed up with dubstep producers and fellow metal-heads Sluggo and Tyler Blue to form Killbot, a “metalstep” collaboration that has signed to Steve Aoki’s Dim Mak dance record label and has announced plans to release a four-track EP. There is also a J Devil solo EP in the works.

Davis has jumped into EDM production with both feet, making use of every waking minute to create new music for all of his projects. “Making electronic music and learning to produce and learning my new instrument—laptop, I call it—has been an amazing thing,” he told Billboard.com recently. “After every Korn show I come offstage, take a shower and I start writing.”

By utilizing high-grade audio production equipment such as the Antelope Eclipse 384, Davis is able to produce release-ready masters right there on the tour bus or the hotel room. “The Eclipse is essential, because it gives me everything I need to work on the road and not just make a demo. The stuff I actually do on the road I keep and it sounds great—it’s not just a demo that I have to rework or re-record later,” he says.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: News, Recording |

Sennheiser Delivers End-to-End Audio Solution at Newport Folk Festival®, As Fans Experience Authentic Sound via Wireless Headphone Technology

Newport, RI – August 9, 2012 – The last weekend of July, audio specialist Sennheiser, in conjunction with event partner Paste Magazine, hosted a live broadcast / recording studio session housed in an alcove of an 18th century fortress, located on the site of this year’s Newport Folk Festival®. By simply donning a pair of Sennheiser RS 120 wireless consumer headphones, music fans were able to experience true-to-life, intimate performances artists from festival artists, including Of Monsters and Men, Tom Morello, Jonah Tolchin and 26 others.

Wherever possible, the entire audio chain consisted of Sennheiser related technology — including microphones from subsidiary Neumann and Sennheiser, preamplifiers from distributed brand TRUE Systems and wireless RF technology from Sennheiser.

The two-day recording session was not without its challenges. These included a live sound stage located just 100 yards away and an extremely reflective — and somewhat leaky — recording environment. Despite all this, the wireless headphones delivered a clean and quiet performance, faithfully representing the artists’ sounds for the duration of the two-day event.

Microphones on stage and in the room included several Neumann TLM 49s and KM 184s, two U 87s and a pair of Sennheiser e 906s. The microphones were connected to a pair of TRUE Systems Precision 8 preamplifiers, which — through a special feature on the back panel of the unit — split the signal and subsequently routed it to both a multi-track recording rig as well as a live mixer. Each of the Sennheiser wireless headphones received a live stereo mix of the multi track recording sessions courtesy of Nashville-based veteran engineer Steve Ledet. A Sennheiser A5000CP antenna was strategically placed in the rear of the grotto, providing a generous amount of RF coverage both inside and outside the grotto.

In addition to having many pairs of wireless headphones on hand, Sennheiser set up a special VIP seating area where listeners could audition an assortment of Sennheiser’s audiophile and professional headphones, including the HD 600, HD 650, HD 700, HD 800 and the new Amperior.

“Each of the performers we hosted at the Sennheiser Sound Lounge at the Paste Ruins takes an enormous amount of pride in the craftsmanship and honesty of their songs — this is of paramount importance to them,” commented Tim Moore, artist relations manager, Sennheiser. “By selecting a complete signal path of Sennheiser family gear before and after the mixing console, we were able to ensure the integrity of the audio at almost every stage. As a result, the performers were able to establish a more direct and honest connection with their fans.”

Singer/songwriter/guitarist Jonah Tolchin, who performed on the second day of the festival, found the Sennheiser Sound Lounge at the Paste Ruins particularly inspiring. “This is just incredible,” he said. “In this environment, with all these great mics, you are so zoned in and focused with all your heart and soul.” Tolchin recently released his debut album entitled Criminal Man, which was recorded using Neumann microphones. “The sound was very crisp and clear — I got true sound out of these mics and my music is true. So it was a good pairing!”

Clips of the performances will be made available for viewing via Sennheiser’s social media outlets over the next several weeks.

Photo captions:
1. Jonah Tolchin sings through a Neumann U 87 microphone, while being filmed at the Sennheiser Sound Lounge at the Paste Ruins.
2. A Sennheiser e 906 was used on many instruments, including a variety of percussion.
3. Four Sennheiser wireless rack units and a TRUE Systems Precision 8 preamplifier were among gear used in the Sennheiser Sound Lounge at the Paste Ruins.
The Neumann U 87 was used on cello and many other strings, and served as the primary vocal microphone throughout the sessions.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Live Sound, News |

Sennheiser and Full Compass to Co-Sponsor Vocal Recording Clinic Featuring Leslie Ann Jones of Skywalker Sound

MADISON, WI—August 8, 2012: Audio specialist Sennheiser and Full Compass Systems, a national leader in professional audio, professional video, A/V, lighting and musical instrument sales, are co-sponsoring a special audio recording clinic on Tuesday, September 11th at the Full Compass facility in Madison, WI. The event will feature renowned, Grammy® award-winning sound engineer Leslie Ann Jones, who will demonstrate vocal recording techniques and cover best practices when recording live vocals in the studio.

Attendees will be provided with a pair of Sennheiser HD 449s, enabling them to monitor both recording and playback. The event will feature door prizes including a K-array Piccolo audio system, a Neumann TLM 102 microphone and a TRUE Systems P-SOLO microphone preamplifier.

Leslie Ann Jones, who is Director of Music Recording and Scoring with Skywalker Sound, has been a recording and mixing engineer for over 30 years. She began her career at ABC Recording Studios in Los Angeles in 1975 before moving to Northern California in 1978 to accept a staff position at the legendary Automatt Recording Studios. There she worked with such artists as Herbie Hancock, Bobby McFerrin, Holly Near, Angela Bofill, and Narada Michael Walden, and started her film score mixing career with “Apocalypse Now.”

From 1987 to 1997 she was a staff engineer at Capitol Studios located in the historic Capitol Records Tower in Hollywood. She recorded projects with Rosemary Clooney, Michael Feinstein, Michelle Shocked, BeBe & CeCe Winans, and Marcus Miller, as well as the scores for several feature films and television shows.

In 2003, Leslie was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Engineered Recording, Classical, and received a Grammy Award for The Kronos Quartet’s recording of Berg: Lyric Suite, which won Best Chamber Music Album. This year, she won a Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Classical for Quincy Porter: Complete Viola Works by Eliesha Nelson & John McLaughlin Williams.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Industry News, News, Studio News |

World renowned DJ legend Bob Sinclar becomes Sennheiser’s first global headphones endorser – combining music with style

Old Lyme, Conn., August 7, 2012 – With a list of hits including ‘World Hold On’ and ‘Love Generation’ as part of his back catalogue, Bob Sinclar can truly be described as a DJ legend. The man who brought the groove back to the dancefloor – a man who marches to the beat of his own tune, producing number ones around the world which are played on radio stations in every country and on every continent. Bob Sinclar has carved out a reputation as one of the most talented DJs on the planet and Sennheiser is proud to announce that he will be its first global endorser for the new Amperior headphones. This is a collaboration be¬tween a man and a company who are both passionate about music and style.

The Sennheiser Amperior brings DJ-club sound quality to the streets – perfect for everyday music fans wanting superior sound as they listen to their beats on the move. The Amperior mobile headphones are a must-have for users wanting to experience the professional quality enjoyed by Bob Sinclar. They combine the pureness of sound of a great performance with a high-end look and style.

For Bob Sinclar sound quality is paramount. Whether three people in a small room are listening to his hits, or a dance floor full of clubbers, the sound needs to be precise and exact, and he gets this with Sennheiser – having used their HD 25 headphones for years. For him, nothing is more important than sound quality in order to share the energy of the songs with his audience; for them to hear, enjoy and react to each beat and every word.

For Bob Sinclar, being a DJ is a way of living – and was his dream since the age of 16. He is passionate about sharing energy with the crowd, creating an environment for them to escape to and lose themselves in their enjoyment of the music.

From the States to South America, Europe, Asia and Australia, the demand for Bob Sinclar’s smooth disco-tinged house sets is unwavering. His flair for blending vocals, instrumentals and rhythms into one soaring, euphoric house set rocks clubs to their very foundation wherever he touches down.

On the partnership with Sennheiser, Bob Sinclar commented, “I have worn Sennheiser headphones since I was 18, since the start of my career, because of the quality of sound. It goes straight to your ear so you can enjoy and lose yourself in the music. I want people on the streets to experience with the Amperior what I myself experience when I DJ, when I produce, when I listen to the music that I not only make, but that inspires me. Sennheiser creates a professional quality of sound for every day, and is the best in the industry.”

Sennheiser Amperior headphones are part of the lifestyle range. Their sound signature has been derived from the legendary HD 25 monitoring headphones. They bring together cutting-edge and superior sound technology with stunning materials to create headphones that people want to be seen wearing. The Amperior come in a silver or blue aluminium finish and are the perfect choice for those who don’t want to choose between perfect sound and cool design. Allowing people to experience club beats wherever they are – a real design statement which means you’ll stand out in the crowd and show your real appreciation for quality sound. Demonstrating their exclusivity, Sennheiser Amperior headphones are currently only available in Apple stores and Apple online stores and they are the perfect fit for the iPad, iPhone and iPod.

Peter Callan, President, Consumer Electronics at Sennheiser explained, “These headphones are essential for all music lovers who want to experience the pure joy of a great sound performance – whenever they want and wherever they go. We are extremely excited and proud to be working with Bob Sinclar, a true musical legend, who combines fashion and style with music – just like the new Amperior.”

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Live Sound, News |

Sennheiser & Paste Create Intimate Performance Space at Newport Folk Festival®, Showcasing A New Generation of Inspired Artists

Newport, RI – August 2, 2012 – Since its founding in 1959, the annual Newport Folk Festival® has served as a beacon for devout music fans and artists around the world. Last weekend, audio specialist Sennheiser and Paste Magazine introduced festival attendees to the Sennheiser Sound Lounge at The Paste Ruins, where they were able to experience up-close and personal performances from their favorite artists through a pair of Sennheiser RS 120 wireless headphones. 29 of the festival’s 45 performing artists took part in the performances — including Of Monsters and Men, Tom Morello, Jonah Tolchin and many others.

The two-day recording session — which was open for music fans to view and experience first-hand — took place in a grotto-like alcove located in the quad of Fort Adams State Park. Despite the acoustic challenges of having a live sound stage located just 100 yards away, fans attending the Sennheiser Sound Lounge were able to enjoy intimate performances courtesy of the Sennheiser wireless headphones, which were fed a live stereo mix of the multi-track recording sessions in progress. Clips of the performances will be made available for viewing via Sennheiser’s social media outlets beginning in two weeks.

“The Sennheiser Sound Lounge at the Paste Ruins was a huge draw at the festival this year,” commented Tim Moore, artist relations manager of Sennheiser. “It gave music fans the opportunity to discover and experience a new generation of heartfelt music in an incredibility intimate environment. Having the Sennheiser wireless headphones on hand also helped deliver the true sound that today’s music fans crave.”

In addition to having over 300 pairs of Sennheiser wireless headphones on hand for fans to enjoy authentic sound quality, a special VIP section was set up where listeners could audition an assortment of the company’s audiophile headphones, including the HD 600, HD 650, HD 700, HD 800 and the new Amperior.

Sennheiser, which owns the leading microphone brand Neumann, also used its technology on the stage wherever possible to ensure that the best possible sound quality was captured at the source.

Nick Purdy, publisher of Paste, commented: “When you come to a festival, you don’t expect to be able to get 10 or 20 feet away from the artist and experience a close, intimate performance apart from what they may do on the big stage. By partnering with Sennheiser, who helped create the environment while providing microphones, wireless headphones and other equipment, we were able to create one of the more memorable highlights of the festival.”

Singer/songwriter/guitarist Jonah Tolchin, who performed on the second day of the festival, found the Sennheiser Sound Lounge / Paste Ruins performance space particularly inspiring. “This is just incredible,” he said. “In this environment, with all these great mics, you are so zoned in and focused with all your heart and soul.” Tolchin recently released his debut album entitled Criminal Man, which was recorded using Neumann microphones. “The sound was very crisp and clear — I got true sound out of these mics and my music is true. So it was a good pairing!”

Photo captions:
1. Music fans peer over the bales of hay to view performances in the Sennheiser Sound Lounge.
2. A ‘behind the scenes’ view of a recording session by Jonah Tolchin.
3. Music fans experiencing the true sound of Sennheiser.
4. Over 300 Sennheiser wireless headphones were put into use during the Sennheiser Sound Lounge / Paste Ruins event at the Newport Folk Festival®.
5. Jonah Tolchin and all the other performers were miked with Neumann and Sennheiser microphones. Tolchin is pictured singing through a Neumann U 87.

About Sennheiser

Sennheiser is a world-leading manufacturer of microphones, headphones and wireless transmission systems. Established in 1945 in Wedemark, Germany, Sennheiser is now a global brand represented in 60 countries around the world with U.S. headquarters in Old Lyme, Conn. Sennheiser’s pioneering excellence in technology has rewarded the company with numerous awards and accolades including an Emmy, a Grammy, and the Scientific and Engineering Award of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

You can find all the latest information on Sennheiser by visiting our website.

Media Contacts:

Jeff Touzeau
Public Relations
Hummingbird Media, Inc.
(914) 602-2913
jeff@hummingbirdmedia.com

Rachel Smolin
Public Relations
Sennheiser Electronic Corporation
(860) 434-9190, Ext. 180
rsmolin@sennheiserusa.com

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Live Sound, News |

K-array Loudspeakers Make the Grade in Oxford’s Sheldonian Theatre, Bridging the Present and the Past

Oxford, UK – July 30, 2012: The Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford is among the city’s — and indeed England’s — most prized performance jewels. Designed by Sir Christopher Wren, one of the most highly regarded architects in history, and constructed between 1664 and 1669, it is still very much a part of Oxford culture and is used not only for music concerts, but also degree ceremonies for local University students, celebrations, lectures and a number of other events. Recently, over the course of a painstakingly detailed restoration, a state of the art K-array loudspeaker system was installed to help bring the acoustics of this priceless architectural gem into the modern age.

Among the Sheldonian’s unique architectural details are its arch layout and a large cupola; its shape allows it to be used in a variety of ways. For example, during degree ceremonies, a presenter will typically speak from one side of the theatre, while during conferences, speakers might address the audience from the opposite side. For each event, a decision is made on whether to involve all or part of the seating on each of the theatre’s three levels.

Since the interior restoration included delicate finishes and flourishes, a core requirement in the installation was to ensure that the sound system would not interfere or otherwise obstruct its unique architectural details. Additionally, the loudspeaker system needed to perform across variety of performance and event applications, while delivering an extremely high standard of audio quality. The chosen K-array system, distributed by Sennheiser, was able to gracefully meet and exceed these requirements.

“We had to design a system which could work in both directions, with various combinations of loudspeakers used at different times,” said Brian Hillson, managing director of B+H Sound, the company responsible for designing and installing the new system. B+H Sound installed (12) KV50W compact line-array modules comprised of eight 1” neodymium transducers and two KKS50W bass line array systems, powered by two KA7 compact amplifiers and one single KA10.

The KV50W was able to provide even sound coverage while minimizing reflections —which was important considering the semicircular shape of the space and the three superimposing orders of tribunes. The (12) speakers were discreetly placed along the handrail of the stairs leading to the organ, as well as on the doorframes and at the sides of the buttresses positioned on the ground floor and third floor. The chassis themselves were then painted to match the colors of the theatre, making them almost invisible. The two KKS50W units were then hidden within the stair structure.

“With DSP programming at the front end, the speakers could easily be controlled to suit any particular application, depending on which orientation the theatre is used in,” Hillson continued. A series of presets was created so that the theatre’s custodian can pre-select them depending on the intended use of the theatre.

The project was an important work of ‘technological restoration,’ carried out in close contact with both the contractor and the University building surveyor. “One of the professors, and Chair of Curators who had been involved in the project came in and asked where the speakers were,” says Hillson. “That to me said everything about the advantages of using K-array.”

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Industry News, Live Sound, News |

As Rockport Music Expands Operations and Musical Repertoire, Neumann KK 205 Capsule Delivers Unmatched Performance

Rockport, MA – July 25, 2012: Premium audio brand Neumann announced that Rockport Music has acquired several Neumann KK 205 capsules in addition to four channels of Sennheiser 2000 series wireless. The new equipment helps Rockport ensure it is able to deliver premium sound quality over the course of its 52 week programming schedule.

Rockport Music, which is best known for its Rockport Chamber Music Festival which began in 1981, has recently undergone significant expansion of both its physical footprint and musical repertoire. In 2010, it opened the Shalin Liu Performance Center, an elegant building that houses its 334 seat, world-class concert hall as well as a multi-function/reception space located on the 3rd floor used for corporate meetings, intimate performances, wedding receptions and many other activities.

The acquisition of the Neumann KK 205 capsules, as well as Sennheiser EM 2050 two channel receivers, Sennheiser SKM 2000 handheld wireless transmitters and lavalier body packs, in addition to a new antenna combiner, helps Rockport realize enormous performance flexibility while offering an unmatched dimension of audio quality to discriminating artists — many of whom insist on performing with Neumann.

Since the new facility opened, Rockport has gone from being a six week performance operation to a 52 week one, simultaneously expanding its repertoire beyond classical to now include jazz, folk, world music, pop and just about every other conceivable musical genre. The new concert hall has advanced A/V facilities including a 20 foot projection screen, and routinely features high definition simulcasts of performances by the Metropolitan Opera and England’s National Theater.

“During my first year here in 2010, one of my first goals was to bolster and enhance our in-house P.A. equipment,” commented David Shriver, technical operations manager for Rockport. “Having very high quality wireless handheld mics and belt packs was very important to me since I wanted a system that could be mostly used on stage but also offer flexible usage applications for other spaces in our facility.”

“The deciding factor for me in adding the Sennheiser 2000 wireless series came when Neumann introduced the KK 204 and KK 205 capsules this year,” Shriver continued. “I get rider requests for Neumann mics all the time, and I knew this was the direction we needed to go in. Neumann is the gold standard in microphones, and when an artist comes in and sees a Neumann mic, they are instantly confident in its ability to deliver.”

When the new Sennheiser 2000 wireless system is not being used in the concert hall, Shriver is able to use it on the 3rd floor multi-function/reception space: “Sennheiser’s Dave Missall came out, looked at the situation, and recommended an RF solution with antennas in the reception space and an antenna combiner to the existing antenna system in the concert hall. This enables me to use my four new RF systems in both places.”

While evaluating the new capsules and wireless sytem, Shriver relied on Rob Pemberton of Wellesley, MA-based Parsons Audio, who was proud to assist in the upgrade of such a world class facility, as well as Sennheiser area sales manager Mike Cleary. “Mike was great,” recalls Shriver. “He would let me try out a bunch of different microphones while we were trying to figure out what to buy — not just for handheld vocal mics, but for drums and other instruments as well.”

Shriver and Rockport Music are pleased with their new equipment acquisition: “The quality has been just top notch,” comments Shriver. “Since we added the Neumann capsules, a number of guest engineers and visiting bands have expressed their interest in working here and performing with the Neumann capsules on the stage. The sound makes a world of difference and also makes my job easier. I can run the mics flat and they sound great — also there is greater feedback rejection when compared to other microphones.”

Award-Winning Features
The acoustic features of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads are derived from the multiple award-winning wired Neumann stage microphones, the KMS 104 and KMS 105. The KK 204, with its cardioid pattern, ensures the best possible suppression of sound originating from 180 degrees to the rear, while the supercardioid KK 205 has greater directivity, and maximizes incident sound from the front as compared to sound from the rear. Due to the “single polar pattern design,” the polar patterns are very uniform over the entire frequency range and provide excellent resistance to feedback.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Industry News, Live Sound, News |

Colorado Symphony Orchestra and Minnesota Public Radio Enhance Workflow with Neumann Digital Microphone Technology

Denver (CO), Minneapolis (MN), 24 July 2012 – Recording a large orchestral performance can involve extreme dynamic level changes, highly reverberant environments and dozens of channels of microphones, cables and associated electronic circuitry. Using traditional analog equip­ment, controlling these factors can be cumbersome, and maintaining a simple, agile workflow is often difficult. Using several dozen analog microphones onstage significantly raises the noise floor, and may introduce distortion during loud passages. Now, with Neumann’s pioneering range of digital microphones, users can experience an all-digital workflow — dramatically increasing signal integrity and user controllability.

A “Twenty-First Century Orchestra” Goes Digital

Since returning to the Colorado Symphony Orchestra (CSO) to take up the position of President/CEO, Gene Sobczak has begun to modernize the organization with an ambitious program of performances featuring pop and rock artists, recordings, webcasts and educational outreach. Sobczak has also forged relationships between Mike Pappas, a Denver-based recording engineer, and Sennheiser Electronic Corporation to ensure that every nuance of the orchestra is captured with innovative digital microphone technology from Neumann.

The CSO has already shared the stage this year with Trey Anastasio of the rock band Phish, Denver-based multi-instrumentalists DeVotchKa, and Boston-based alt-rockers Guster. In his role as volunteer engineer for the CSO, Pappas captured all three of these shows with an arsenal of Neumann digital microphones.

Realizing Agility and Simplicity

Pappas used 56 KM D series Neumann digital mics in a variety of omni-directional, cardioid and hypercardioid polar patterns. The mic list also included a Neumann KU 100 dummy head binaural stereo microphone for hall ambience, and a KMR 82 D shotgun for spot miking.

When using analog microphones and mixers, self-noise causes the noise floor to become more audible as channel counts increase. This is not the case with digital microphones however, which maintain a consistent noise floor whether one is using a single unit or three dozen units. “In a conventional analog mic setup,” says Pappas, “mix 24 channels together and the noise floor comes up by 15 dB. Now, take 56 analog microphones and you’re looking at the noise floor coming up by 20 or 25 dB. This is significantly lower when using digital microphones. With a Neumann digital microphone you go from capsule to A-to-D converter in less than an inch. What that means is that you don’t have this low level analog signal running through hundreds and hundreds of feet of cable, and then into your preamps. In the end, all the cable does is add more noise.”

Simple Workflow, Astounding Results

Pappas’ workflow is typically very simple: Neumann mics plugged into Neumann Digital Microphone Interface (DMIs), with the signals converted into MADI for transport to a DiGiCo mixing console for monitoring while recording into a computer running Apple Logic software. “The workflow is easier because there’s less stuff you need to worry about when you use digital mics,” Pappas observes. “You plug them in, fire up the software and the system pretty much runs itself. Plus we don’t have problems with things like hums and buzzes.”

“We recorded analog for many years with some of the best gear on the planet,” says Pappas. “When we switched over to full digital, the first thing we noticed was that we could hear the hall very clearly. We couldn’t hear this with analog gear because the noise floor of the gear was significantly greater than the noise floor of the hall.” Since Pappas received his first batch of Neumann digital mics back in 2004, he hasn’t looked back.

A Leading Broadcaster Forays into Digital Mics
Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), which established itself in 1967 as a classical music station, has grown to become one of the United States’ premier public radio entities and currently operates a 43-station radio network. American Public Media (APM), MPR’s parent organization, is the nation’s largest distributor of classical music programming. MPR frequently records and broadcasts the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra (SPCO) for “Performance Today,” a program that reaches 1.3 million listeners on 256 stations each week.

The SPCO is a 34-piece ensemble and the only full-time chamber orchestra in the U.S. Now in its 53rd season, the ensemble enjoys a reputation as one of the finest chamber orchestras in the world.

In early April, Cameron Wiley, MPR technical director for SPCO programming, implemented an eight-channel system at a performance by the ensemble at Wooddale Church in Eden Prairie, MN. He recorded the concert to a Nuendo system using Neumann KM 183 D, KM 184 D and KM 185 D digital microphones, with the main mic array arranged in a modified Decca Tree configuration.

Since there was no rehearsal, Wiley had to take an educated guess while setting levels based on his experience recording the SPCO with his analog rig – the tympani proved troublesome. Thankfully, he recalls, the increased headroom afforded by the Neumann digital system handled the KM 143 D spot mic with no distortion. “That mic was being hit pretty hard, but it handled this very well. If we had used analog, it wouldn’t have survived those levels.”

As a longtime user of analog microphones, Wiley appreciates the benefits of an all-digital mic setup – especially the control provided by Neumann’s Remote Control Software (RCS). “Being able to control polar patterns as well as onboard DSP can be a lifesaver. Having that capability in a mic is fantastic and it certainly makes workflow much easier to deal with.”

To learn more about Neumann digital microphones, please visit http://www.neumann.com.

Image Captions:

CSO_1.jpg:
Resident Conductor Scott O’Neil conducting the Colorado Symphony Orchestra with a Neumann KM 133 D capturing the sound (photo credit: Darius Panahpour)

CSO_2.jpg:
The Neumann KM D digital microphones feature extended dynamic range and an extremely low noise floor, making them perfectly suited for orchestral recordings (photo credit: Darius Panahpour)

Neumann_KM D_family.jpg:
The Neumann KM D family of digital microphones features an agile selection of omni, cardioid and super-cardioid polar patterns

Neumann KM 184 D.jpg:
The Neumann KM 184 D was used during a recent recording by MPR

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Live Sound, New Products, News, Recording |

Sennheiser’s RF Wireless Sound Academy Seminar Comes to New York City August 6th

New York City — July 19, 2012 — Audio specialist Sennheiser announced that it will be offering its highly regarded RF Wireless Sound Academy Seminar in New York City on Monday, August 6th in mid-town Manhattan. The seminar costs $199 and includes continental breakfast, full lunch, workshop materials, and a $50 rebate coupon good for Sennheiser and Neumann products. Participants who complete the seminar will earn 6 RU CTS credits.

This single-day workshop is designed to teach attendees how to plan for trouble-free operation of multi-channel wireless microphones and wireless personal monitoring systems in even the toughest environments. Topics will include:

- RF theory plus practical tips and tricks to maximize reliability

- Reserving TV channels for events on the new FCC spectrum database system

- Best practices for system planning and frequency coordination

- Working with wireless monitoring systems

- New developments in digital RF systems

The event will feature several experts in the field including host and presenter Joe Ciaudelli and special guest Volker Schmitt: the RF engineer who spearheaded the creation of Sennheiser’s most successful and innovative products, including the popular evolution wired, evolution wireless, MKH, MKE, and 3000 and 5000 series.

Other highly qualified guest speakers include Uwe Sattler and Ben Escobedo of Sennheiser, Broadway RF and audio engineer, Andrew Funk and Henry Cohen, president and senior RF engineer at Production Radio – an RF engineering, consulting and event services firm serving entertainment, production and corporate clients. Following are details on the event and how to register:

- Where: Musicians Union Local 802, 322 W 48th St., New York City

- When: Monday, August 6th 2012 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

- Cost/registration: $199 per participant (register before July 27th and receive a $20 discount). Complete registration details, bios of guest speakers and more information at http://www.sennheiserusa.com/RFseminar.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Industry Events, Live Sound, News |

At Skaggs Place Studio in Nashville, Ricky Skaggs Depends on Neumann KH 120 Monitors to ‘Tell the Truth’

Nashville, TN – July 12, 2012: Once again, multiple GRAMMY winner and Christian artist Ricky Skaggs has been hard at work with “the boys” — his longtime band Kentucky Thunder, which have been playing bluegrass music alongside him for over 15 years. Each time Skaggs and his band enter the studio — usually at his own “Skaggs Place Studio” — the resulting music pays homage to the early trailblazers of bluegrass music, while forging entirely new paths within the seemingly timeless genre.

As an artist, Skaggs is wholly committed to authenticity and detail in his recordings. He is an avid collector of vintage microphones and esoteric gear, and constantly in pursuit of the latest sonic building blocks that will help make his recordings stand the test of time. The latest addition to his studio? The new Neumann KH 120 studio monitors. We chatted with Ricky to learn more about his recent projects, and why it’s important to have a loudspeaker that tells the truth…..

What have you been up to lately?
“Me and the boys [Kentucky Thunder] have gotten together and will be putting out a bluegrass record — the first one since Honoring the Fathers, which we recorded several years ago. We’ve cut two days of tracks, about six songs on which we are now working on overdubs. In the coming weeks, we will be doing more tracks, as well as singing and overdubs. For this record, which will have a lot of variety, I’ve brought in Gordon Kennedy [producer] for moral support. I really wanted him involved because I didn’t want it to be just another bluegrass record. Gordon is able to bring some input and creativity that I wouldn’t necessarily think to bring to the project. Beyond this, I’ve been working on a live CD of Bruce Hornsby and myself. Last time we toured, we did a lot of live recordings on the road and we’ve been going through those live shows and hope to get a record out soon.”

Tell us about your first experiences with the Neumann KH 120 monitors
“When I found out that Neumann was doing monitors, I knew they wouldn’t do anything unless it was excellent — because they have never done anything outside of excellence. If it was Neumann, it was going to be great. I first heard the KH 120s out at Winter NAMM and I was just blown away. I really loved what I was hearing. There is something in the midrange that highlights the acoustic instruments and strings, and the highs are not too bright or harsh. Finally, I just can’t believe how small they are and how great they sound.”

How about the low end?
“Typically it is a little bit harder to define the low end, but everything translates great through the KH 120s. In general, I was really impressed and surprised with their performance given their small size, and could not believe that that such clarity in the low end could be achieved without a subwoofer. The low end of my mixes sound tighter now — and in bluegrass, this is important on instruments like the upright bass and the acoustic guitar. We know that when we get to the mastering facility, that the entire low end will be nice and tight.

Why is the crossover important and how does the KH 120 perform in this regard?
“For any instrument that occupies the midrange, you’ve got to have crossovers that are extremely quick, smooth and transparent. The crossover on the Neumanns is very smooth and you can really hear this on acoustic guitars and mandolins. This is exactly what I hear from the KH 120s, and highlights the thing that I love most about them: the midrange. My instruments sound like I know they should.”

Why have the KH 120s earned a place at Skaggs Place Studio?
“I want the safety net of having a great monitor system — it takes the guesswork out of recording and mixing, and you can be more confident in what you are putting down to tape. I know the low end is there, as well as the mids and the highs. Nothing is falsified and it is the real thing. I don’t like cutting any corners — especially in the recording studio. Once you cut something and put it out, it is out there forever. As an artist, I want to make sure that the recording represented the best that I could be at that moment in time.”

You are no stranger to Neumann. Tell us about your collection of Neumann microphones

“My history with Neumann goes back a long way, and to me, the company’s microphones represent the gold standard. I have a U 47 that was once used by folks like Dolly Parton, George Jones and Johnny Cash. I also have two U 69s, which we use on everything including the piano on the recent Bruce Hornsby recording. I bought some KM 64s years ago that had been owned by a traveling gospel band, The Happy Goodman Family. My Neumann KM 66, an early version of the KM 86, is our all-time favorite guitar mic. I also use and appreciate the newer Neumann microphone models such as the TLM 102, TLM 103 and of course the M 149 and U 87.”

Photo captions:
1. Ricky Skaggs, pictured alongside the Neumann KH 120 monitor
2. The Neumann KH 120 monitors are the latest edition to Nashville’s Skaggs Place Studio

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Industry News, News, Recording, Studio News |

Calendar

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Your Account

Subscribe

Subscribe to RSS Feed

Subscribe to MyYahoo News Feed

Subscribe to Bloglines

Google Syndication

Fairlight Xynergi Media Production Centre


Mix Briefing Room, a virtual press conference offering postings of the latest gear and music news, direct from the source. Visit the Briefing Room for the latest press postings.