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EASTWEST’s Flagship Orchestral Series Now Available

The most comprehensive orchestral collection on the market includes Hollywood Orchestral Strings, Brass, Woodwinds, and Percussion

Hollywood, CA (October 29, 2014) – With the recent release of Hollywood Orchestral Percussion, EASTWEST now offers the most detailed and comprehensive orchestral virtual instrument collection on the market: Hollywood Orchestra. The company’s flagship product includes Hollywood Strings, Hollywood Brass, Hollywood Orchestral Woodwinds and Hollywood Orchestral Percussion, all produced by award-winning team comprised of Doug Rogers, Nick Phoenix, Thomas Bergersen, and engineer Shawn Murphy.


“This has been our labor of love – we’ve worked over a five year period as we completed each of the sections,” says Doug Rogers. “We are proud to now offer a complete professional orchestra that is able to meet any demands composers might have. It’s a true EASTWEST milestone.”

Each individual section of Hollywood Orchestra has received multiple awards from the international press for its unprecedented detail, superior true legato, sound quality, and sound control with five user-controllable mic positions, including main pickup (Decca tree), mid pickup, close pickup, surround pickup, and an alternate vintage circa 1945 RCA ribbon room pickup.

Producer Mark Linthicum says: “I love the realism of these Hollywood instruments. For the first time I can go for a big bombastic Hollywood sound, or an intimate sound with the mic options included. There’s really nothing else that can do this. It’s a game changer!”

Truly the Holy Grail for serious film, television, videogame, and music composers, Hollywood Orchestra is the culmination of over five years of recording in the famous EASTWEST Studio 1, the home of major Hollywood Soundtracks and Television Themes. It includes PLAY 4 32-bit/64-bit software, powerful scripting for ease of use, and more user control than any other virtual instrument.

For more details, please visit www.soundsonline.com/Hollywood-Orchestra

System Requirements
680GB free hard disc space, iLok security key (not provided)

Pricing & Availability
Gold and Silver versions are downloadable, Diamond is supplied on a hard drive due to the size of the collection. To purchase and for more information, please visit www.soundsonline.com/hollywood-orchestra

• Diamond Edition: MSRP $2996, Introductory price $1495
• Gold Edition: MSRP $1996, Introductory price $995
• Silver Edition: MSRP $996, Introductory price $495 (coming soon)

About EASTWEST
EASTWEST (www. soundsonline.com) has been dedicated to perpetual innovation and uncompromising quality of Sample Libraries and Virtual Instruments for 25 years, setting the industry standard as the most critically acclaimed soundware developer. More about EASTWEST at soundsonline.com, on Facebook and Twitter.

THE BOX BRINGS BIG CONSOLE SOUND INTO SMALL SPACES

John_FishellMUNCIE, INDIANA – OCTOBER 2014: Assistant Professor John Fishell teaches music media and production at Ball State University in Indiana, but enjoys recording from his home. In order to get a large format sound in the small space, Fishell turned to Vintage King and the BOX console from API. The BOX was the perfect size for Fishell’s small footprint requirement, considering his entire studio is located in the second bedroom of his apartment. However, the footprint of the console is the only thing he finds small about it. When asked what advice he would give to others considering a BOX of their own, Fishell responded: “Brace yourself, you are playing with the big boys now. With API, there should be no such thing as puny-sounding tracks. The built-in compressor is powerful, yet easy to use and makes a difference.”

In addition to the BOX, Fishell has accumulated quite the API collection, including six API 550b EQs, four JDK V14 EQs, and twelve API 225L compressors. He says his first experience with API gear was when he was a student himself at Omega recording studios in Rockville, Maryland. There he got to work with a 2488 in the B room, and he’s been a fan ever since. When he decided on the BOX himself, no other company would do. “I was very happy with my modular API DSM system, and I knew I wanted to stay with their summing. The features like the built-in 550A made me lust after the BOX. I was able to seamlessly integrate API outboard gear that I already owned through inserts and patch points.” Fishell has worked as independent engineer, producer, and musician since 1993. He has also worked full-time at James Madison University, Middle Tennessee State, University of Colorado at Denver, American University, and now Ball State.

At home, Fishell primarily focuses on rock and jazz, occasionally working on classical music as well. Even though he has only had the BOX installed for a few months, it has already recorded almost a dozen different artists such as Dave Liebman and Mike Stern. When he compares it to other consoles, Fishell will argue that the BOX holds its own: “The BOX has the same ‘mojo’ and coloration of API’s bigger consoles, so I can compete with other pro mix facilities in the comfort of my small apartment. It does a great job – better than mixes that stay in the ‘digital box’. Even classical and jazz projects benefit from the ‘muscle’ that API gear provides.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608, and the BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

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Mastering Engineer Colin Leonard Gets Dangerous in his Highly Customized Analog Studio ‘SING Mastering’

Atlanta-based ‘SING Mastering’ uses Dangerous Master, Monitor and BAX EQ at the core of a unique mastering setup —

...Mastering engineer Colin Leonard

…Mastering engineer Colin Leonard

Edmeston, NY – October 29, 2014 – Mastering engineer Colin Leonard works a lot with major record labels on singles, albums and custom masters for the very latest music videos – as well as hit Indie artist projects. At his Atlanta, GA, ‘SING Mastering‘ studio he’s built a unique and highly customized analog setup based around a core of Dangerous Music’s Master transfer console and Dangerous Monitor combination, and the Dangerous BAX EQ – among many other pieces of choice equipment and speakers. As Leonard says “It’s a no compromise mastering facility.” Some of Leonard’s recent mastering credits include Echosmith, Kimbra, Icona Pop, Leona Lewis, Justin Bieber, Mastodon and Mystery Skulls, working with record labels such as Warner Bros., Sony Music, Atlantic Records, Republic Records and Universal Records.

“I am currently using a Dangerous Master, a Dangerous Monitor and a Dangerous BAX EQ,” states Leonard. “I’ve never mastered a song without a Dangerous Master! And I can’t imagine it (laughs). The Master is one of those pieces that is just the ‘heart’ of the system. When I came into mastering, that was the very first mastering console that I used. The Master is an awesome piece for me.”

Although he has lots of gear, and most of it quite unique, he still goes for less-is-more, “I’m kind of a simplicity guy, all of the processing on my masters is analog. I don’t usually use plug-ins, and I try to keep cables real short between each piece of equipment, we make our own cables and use quality materials,” he says.

EDIT-SING-Mastering-WEB2Inside the Master
Leonard has compared “Mid-Side” systems and finds the implementation of the “S&M” feature built into the Dangerous Master far superior, “With the S&M feature on the Master, you can really fix some problems in mixes, and address balance issues. I have a couple EQs that I can use with that circuit to adjust stuff in the side, or if I need to bring a vocal out in the middle I can do that. It’s a really great sounding circuit. Comparing it to Mid-Side processors in the digital realm I just think it’s a ‘Day and Night’ difference. I don’t really know why technically the Mid-Side available on plug-ins sound so weird to me, but it does. The biggest thing is, you can kind of get away with cutting dBs in a plug-in, but as soon as you try to boost the Mid or the Side it sounds terrible to me; With analog, there is a lot more headroom. To me, the Dangerous Master’s Mid-Side circuit sounds a lot better.”

Describing how his outboard connects to the Dangerous Master, Leonard says, “I can either run into the input of the Master or I can run into the input of some other gear to have a different sound. I can bypass the input stage on the Master if I want to and run into the inserts. The inserts are set up really simply using my six different EQs and a couple of compressors. I don’t do a lot of compression, I am more of an EQ person, especially these days when mixes are usually compressed already! (laughs) But I have a lot of EQ flavors.”

And finally, he relates, “Another thing that’s really cool about the Dangerous Monitor in combination with the Dangerous Master is the ‘input monitor offset’. That way I can take an unprocessed mix and turn it up as loud as my master in the analog domain with an offset, and I can compare the original mix to the master at exactly the same volume. That’s really important. Without the offset you’re comparing the mix that might be 6dB quieter with a master that’s loud. It’s kind of impossible to compare the two sonically. Other than just saying, ‘Wow! That one’s a lot louder!’ When you use both the Dangerous Master and Monitor to do that, it’s seamless, Dangerous Music thought it out really well.”

BAX And All That
Although on SING Mastering’s website Leonard alludes to some ‘secret boxes’ that he uses to get his sound, he quickly relates, “The Dangerous BAX, honestly, is one of my favorite EQs for real small adjustments and it has some really unique EQ curve shapes obviously. I think it can be really great in combination with other EQs. I actually use the BAX differently than other people I’ve talked to, I use it at the beginning of my chain and use it as a really broad stroke and then fine tune afterwards with other pieces of gear.”

Monitoring The Dangerous Way
On his history with the Dangerous Monitor, Leonard recalls, “Actually when I started mastering I was just lucky to have access to a Chris Muth 2040 monitoring setup. After a few years I changed to the Dangerous Monitor, and at first it was a little weird because it has a stepped volume control, and the Muth 2040 that I had used had originally been ordered with the ‘Alps big blue’ control which was a continuous pot, so it took me a little while to get used to the Monitor’s stepped volume control. But then the accuracy and repeatability of the stepped control on the Monitor was awesome.”

Adding a bit more background, he adds, “The Muth 2040 didn’t have a DAC built in, so you had to use a ‘room’ DAC, which was normally a less sophisticated DAC in those days because when you were switching back and forth between digital sources, an old high-end DAC usually had some delay while switching and re-clocking so the thing to use was a DAC that was fast. The DAC that’s built into the Dangerous Monitor is really good and it’s fast. I really fell in love the with Dangerous Monitor. For me it’s an improvement over the 2040, having used both of them. The DAC in the Monitor is my only monitor path DAC.”

Leonard has a last point on controlling his listening, first, “I love the Dangerous Monitor for its transparency and accuracy with tracking with the stepped volume control. As a mastering engineer it’s really a necessity to have instantaneous digital switching with a common converter – and that’s what the Monitor supplies! I can get real world comparisons between different sources at the same time instantaneously with the same converter.”

Customized Is The Deal
Customizing practically all his equipment puts Leonard is a unique position of knowing his own gear better than anyone could, but it isn’t that unusual in a mastering studio he relates, “I am really picky about equipment and I think that incremental improvements add up at the end of the day. I try to make the quality of my gear as good as possible, and with mastering kind of everything is custom anyway it seems.”

He reveals some of his top outboard pieces beyond his ‘Dangerous BAX starting-point’, “I have a couple custom Neumann W495B units, a set of modified Neumann OE DUO EQs, some old Motown style inductor EQs that are customized Electrodyne circuits, a Fred Forsell Millennia NSEQ-2, and an SPL PQ. My speakers are custom too,” adds Leonard. “They are the last pair of the Tyler Acoustics D1′s, they were made by Ty Lashbrook, with two Pass Labs amps drive them and custom crossovers with cabinet modifications. Then I have a couple custom subwoofers, the sub cabinets are designed by Ty with the servo drivers designed by Danny Richie.”

SING-Mastering-Main-WEB2As in any great studio, gear is often only half the equation, “The SING Mastering room is a very cool design, it uses a ratio by acoustician M.M. Louden, he’s kind of the king of rectangular room ratios,” states Leonard. “My room is really an optimized Louden ratio. It’s over 30 feet long and really wide and has tall ceilings, it’s a big, open natural space. It’s a ‘dead end’ in the front and a ‘live end’ in the back, which is pretty common for mastering rooms.”

Check out SING Mastering and more about engineer Colin Leonard at: http://www.singmastering.com

About Dangerous Music
Dangerous Music, Inc. designs and builds award-winning hardware products that are indispensable to any DAW-based recording, mixing or mastering environment. The Company pioneered the concept of the dedicated analog summing buss for digital audio workstations with the Dangerous 2-Bus in 2001. Today, Dangerous Music offers a wide range of products for recording, mastering, mixing and post-production facilities, all designed and built with mastering-quality standards and a practical aesthetic. Key products include the Dangerous 2-Bus and 2-Bus LT, Dangerous Monitor ST-SR, Dangerous D-Box, Dangerous Master, Dangerous Liaison, Dangerous Monitor, Dangerous Source, Dangerous BAX EQ, and the Dangerous Compressor.

For more information on Dangerous Music visit http://www.dangerousmusic.com phone 845-202-5100 or email: info@dangerousmusic.com

All trademarks are the property of their respective holders. Description and specifications are subject to change without notice.

Chartmakers Mastering Stocks Up On Prism Sound Kit

Henkka Niemisto photo credit Christoffer Relander (1024x683)

High profile Finnish mastering studio, Chartmakers Mastering, recently bought both a Prism Sound Dream AD-2 A/D converter and an MEA-2 EQ for its state-of-the-art facility in the Töölö district of the nation’s capital, Helsinki.

Established by Svante Forsbäck together with long-term associate Henkka Niemistö, the studio is celebrating its tenth birthday this year and is as dedicated to high-quality audio mastering services as ever.

“All music styles are more than welcome to use our services,” says Niemistö. “I usually work with pop, dance, hip-hop and electronic music and some metal and rock groups. My clients are mainly Finnish bands and include Husky Rescue, Pepe Deluxe, Sofi De La Torre, Machinae Supremacy and many more.”

Chartmakers currently runs three studios in Helsinki itself and a satellite about 20 minutes to the west in Espoo. Niemistö is a firm believer that the simplest mastering chain of very high-grade equipment delivers the best results. As such, he says that the AD-2 and the MEA-2 have both been on his mind for a long time.

“It was time to finally give them a go,” he says. “Svante and I have gone through pretty much everything on the mastering market, and Prism Sound was, for me, the last largely untested equipment to try.”

The kit was supplied by Finnish distributor Qualitron and Niemistö says that as soon as the converter and the EQ were connected he felt right at home with them.

“They are a joy to use. The converter continues to surprise me, almost every day,” he says. “The EQ has some strange way of adding a sort of ‘glue’ to the master sound — I can’t really explain it. They both definitely bring the game to the next level.”

Niemistö adds that he particularly likes the fact that the converter can drive two different sample rates to different AES/EBU outputs.
“The clock also sounds very nice,” he says. “Since I do a lot of bassy electronic music I love the fact that the EQ goes down to 19Hz and up to 27k.”

Niemistö is using his Prism Sound equipment on all of his current projects where it meshes well into his existing set-up.

“I personally use three Amphion Two18 speakers and two One18s in the back for full surround, and I have a Maselec MTC-2 mastering console,” he explains.

And there might well be more Prism Sound kit added into the Chartmasters slate in the near future.

Niemistö says: “We just got the Prism Sound compressor in to test, and we might have to get that one as well…”

-ends-

About Prism Sound
Founded in 1987, Prism Sound manufacture high-quality professional digital audio equipment for the International broadcast, film, music production, manufacturing and telecommunications sectors. The company’s product range includes the Prism ADA-8XR precision 8-channel converter unit, which is regularly used for music and film soundtrack projects by clients such as EMI Abbey Road, BBC, Sony, Lucasfilm and Walt Disney. Prism Sound also manufactures a range of audio test and measurement products, including the de facto standard DSA-1 handheld digital audio generator/analyser and the dScope Series III audio analyser system.

For more information: www.prismsound.com

Jason Phats Changes Direction with Prism Sound’s Orpheus

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Writer, producer, remixer and DJ Jason Phats has become the latest high-profile musician to purchase a Prism Sound Orpheus Firewire Recording Interface.

“The sound is extremely detailed and transparent. Clarity, depth, separation and stereo imaging is breath-taking – my jaw hit the floor when I first heard it,” he says. “I found myself kicking back in the sweet spot and going through my music collection. Suddenly everything made sense.”

Phats runs the Orpheus through a SSL Sigma summing mixer and likes the unit primarily for its ability to lever both Prism Sound quality conversion and mic preamps into a 1U box and then cram it full of features. These include line, microphone and instrument inputs, selectable RIAA Equalization for turntables, a built-in premium-quality monitoring mixer for each output providing for performer foldback and surround monitoring, and concurrent ADAT and switchable S/PDIF or AES3 digital I/O plus support for outboard MIDI devices.

Phats, who has sold over 5m records in a career spanning nearly quarter of a century. adds that the Orpheus has fundamentally altered the way he works.

“From the moment I started working with the Orpheus I could see myself getting closer to the sound I had been searching for,” he says. “I decided to stop releasing tracks and focus on a goal: a new sound, a new direction.”

Pursuing the new path took time but now, eight months later, Phats and his management are in the process of releasing his new material.

“With the Orpheus I could instantly identify where I was going wrong in my mixes and productions. Once I could understand the mixing process with such detail and depth I was able to achieve exactly what I wanted,” he says.

The first track from the new ‘Phats & Orpehus’ partnership was Jason Phats & Fenton Gee’s \ \ H I T E \ \ A T E R (White Water), which caused a real buzz in Ibiza over the summer. There is plenty more to come too.

“Every day is a joy in the studio with the Orpheus and I am very proud of the new material I have lined up for the future,” he says. “The huge leap in quality has led to some great collaboration.”

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About Prism Sound
Founded in 1987, Prism Sound manufacture high-quality professional digital audio equipment for the International broadcast, film, music production, manufacturing and telecommunications sectors. The company’s product range includes the Prism ADA-8XR precision 8-channel converter unit, which is regularly used for music and film soundtrack projects by clients such as EMI Abbey Road, BBC, Sony, Lucasfilm and Walt Disney. Prism Sound also manufactures a range of audio test and measurement products, including the de facto standard DSA-1 handheld digital audio generator/analyser and the dScope Series III audio analyser system.

For more information: www.prismsound.com

Deutsche Welle Calls on RTW TouchMonitor Range

Broadcaster Selects RTW TM3, TM7 and TM9 Units to Ensure EBU-R128-Compliant Program Levels at Berlin and Bonn Production Sites

COLOGNE, GERMANY, OCTOBER 27, 2014 – When Deutsche Welle, Germany’s premier international broadcaster and a member of the ARD network of German public broadcasters, sought to make its programming compliant with the EBU-R128 loudness mandate, it turned to RTW, the market leader in visual audio meters and monitoring devices, and the company’s TouchMonitor line of audio meters, to make the transition. With their ability to offer intuitive, precise monitoring, along with their ease of installation, RTW’s TM3, TM7 and TM9 TouchMonitor meters were the perfect fit for the job.RTW_TM3_DE_IB_134_Stereo_Num_ATSC

Deutsche Welle first took delivery of the RTW TouchMonitor units last September, employing a combination of 65 TM3, TM7 and TM9 meters with various configurations and feature sets in several recording studios, editing suites and workplaces in its Bonn and Berlin facilities. AVS Medientechnik GmbH, based in Berlin, oversaw the procurement and implementation of the units.

According to Hannes Brandt, technical assistant at Deutsche Welle’s Berlin site, the broadcaster chose RTW on the recommendation of an ARD working group that had tested loudness meters from several manufacturers. He also noted his company had previous experience with the RTW metering systems. “Our production workplaces were already using digital and/or analog peak meters by RTW, as well as metering instruments from their PortaMonitor series, and the positive experience we had with those products, along with RTW customer support, also contributed to the decision to go with RTW.”

Engineers working on various broadcast shows Deutsche Welle’s Berlin and Bonn sites currently employ the RTW TM3 units in a combined setup with the existing RTW PortaMonitor, which is used for monitoring level, loudness, frequency response and phase of analog and digital signals systems, as well as the RTW TM7 units at the company’s dubbing suites (mainly the TM7-VID version, which is installed in the company’s Tektronix mainframes). The TM9 units are being used with an installed radar option, for a more detailed look into the composition of the metering data.

The RTW TM3, TM7 and TM9 units are highly modular, which has made installation into the Deutsche Welle workflow straightforward. The majority of the meters there comprise typical desktop units well-equipped, along with TM7-VID modules supplied with 19-inch rack-mount adapters for waveform monitors as well as TM9 OEM units for installation into mixing consoles. As with all members of RTW’s TouchMonitor family, the TM3, TM7 and TM9 TouchMonitor units can be enhanced with software licenses as future needs arise.
RTW_Touchmonitor_TM9_Screen_web
“We currently use a reference setting of either –17 LUFS or the traditional 0 dB QPPM,” Brandt says. “This allows our users to familiarize themselves with level adjustment based on loudness. However, we currently still support QPPM-based level adjustment. For that purpose, we configured two different layouts on the installed units. As soon as all workplaces are equipped with TM units and all users have undergone appropriate training, we will switch our in-house reference to –23 LUFS by changing the layout presets.

According to Brandt, another major benefit is the unlimited configurability of instrument layouts on the user interface. “This way, we can adjust our meter scales to the requirements at hand,” he notes. “In addition, the constant software refinement and the additional software options ensure maximum protection of our investments.”

The TM7 and TM9 versions offer a 16:9 touch-enabled TFT screen with a display size of 7 or 9 inches, respectively. The operator can quickly scale and place the instruments on the screen for maximum ease of use. With the SW20002 software license installed, the TM7 and TM9 include basic stereo-PPM instruments with analog scales (DIN +5, Nordic, British IIa, British IIb) and digital ones (0 to –60 dB, +3 to –60 dB TruePeak, Quasi-DIN, Quasi-Nordic, Quasi-British IIa, and Quasi-British IIb) as well as peak-hold and correlation meters. Additional features include loudness meters complying with current standards (EBU-R128, ITU-R BS.1770-3/1771-1, ATSC-A/85, ARIB, OP-59) and the MagicLRA instrument used for visualizing loudness range and the integrated loudness. This allows for a unique combined view of all relevant information.

In user mode, the operator can change the parameter settings. Moreover, the units include an SPL view that provides various weighting filters and integration times as well as reference-level parameters for calculating the SPL of an electric input signal. Other loudness-metering specific software modules, such as, for example, the logging-data server (software license SW20014), are unlocked as necessary. This feature adds a logging instrument to the software that allows for transferring metering data from several TouchMonitor units over Ethernet (TCP/IP) to a Windows-based computer running the Loudness Quality Logger (LQL) analysis software. Each TM7 or TM9 unit includes a 16-channel audio interface. Users can choose from a variety of I/O configurations in analog and/or digital formats. Alternatively, a 3G-SDI interface for up to 32 input channels can be implemented. With the SW20001 software expansion for multichannel support installed, the meters on the user interface show each stereo or surround input while the user can monitor and control them.

The compact TM3 features a 4.3-inch touch-enabled screen and a separate interface box. It handles analog and digital stereo signals (TM3) or 6-channel digital audio (TM3-6CH). In its standard configuration, the TM3 offers extensive loudness-metering functions compliant with all globally relevant standards (EBU R128, ITU-R BS.1770-3/1771-1, ATSC A/85, ARIB, OP-59) including single-channel and summing bargraphs, LRA, and numerical displays.

The TM3 offers the same functionality and user-friendly tools as the more advanced TM7 and TM9 at a minimum footprint and lower price. This makes it particularly suitable for journalist cubicles, editing suites, and small control rooms. The TM3 also includes the MagicLRA instruments, used in cooperation with the loudness metering. This instrument provides a quickly and clearly readable view of critical loudness parameters in context supported by its color, shape, and position on the metering scale and thus makes meeting all requirements a breeze.

For more information, please visit www.rtw.com.

About Deutsche Welle (DW)
Deutsche Welle (DW) is Germany’s international broadcaster, providing content in 30 languages on TV, radio, and the Internet. They represent Germany in the international media landscape and offer people on all continents independent information. In addition, they ensure uncensored reporting in restricted media markets and conflict zones. While the Bonn headquarters produce mainly radio features and multimedia contents for the website, their Berlin site is mostly in charge of productions for Deutsche Welle’s six TV channels. In total, Deutsche Welle employs more than 1500 permanent staff plus the same number of freelancers.

About RTW
RTW, based in Cologne (Germany), has nearly 50 years of experience in designing, producing, and marketing advanced recording-studio equipment, leading and innovating the market for high quality audio metering and monitoring tools. RTW operates a worldwide distribution and service network. For more information on RTW, visit www.rtw.com or call +49 221 709130.

Berklee College of Music Expands Its Music Production Facilities with SSL Duality

“Duality is a fine example of what happens when a quality company produces a quality product, and that is why we have two”

BOSTON – Rising 16 stories above the hustle and bustle of Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood, Berklee College of Music has completed its first-ever built-from-the-ground-up residence, rehearsal, performance and educational tower. Dedicated to the art of contemporary music, live performance, music production and engineering in all its forms, the building features a two-story state-of-the-art 10-studio complex designed by Walters-Storyk Design Group (WSDG). Among the largest of its kind in the United States, the facility features scoring and dubbing stages, large tracking and mixing rooms and a mastering studio, along with production suites and a multi-seat tech lab. To ensure students are learning on the latest professional tools, the school installed its second new SSL Duality for tracking and mixing in Studio 3 (aka “The Bridge”), purpose-built for advanced students. Duality delivers the company’s signature sound through an analogue workflow, elegantly integrated with a sophisticated DAW controller, making it ideal for teaching students to work in a hybrid production world.SSL Duality at Berklee College of Music

“Duality nicely bridges the gap between teaching on our traditional in-line analogue consoles, and our DAW controllers,” says Dan Thompson, Assistant Chair of Music Production and Engineering at Berklee College of Music. “The console is an extremely interesting teaching tool because it can act as an advanced analogue console alongside comprehensive control layer for DAW-based projects. In our advanced tracking and mixdown curricula, Duality perfectly illustrates this hybrid workflow and professional paradigm.”

Berklee College of Music has been on the forefront of innovation for more than 65 years, reflecting state-of-the-art of music and music business education, leading the way with the world’s first baccalaureate studies in jazz, rock, electric guitar, film scoring, songwriting, turntables, electronic production and more than a dozen other genres and fields of study. The school’s alumni have won more than 270 Grammy and Latin Grammy Awards (27 of which were won by alumnus Quincy Jones), along with numerous Emmy and Academy Awards. With this pedigree, the new studios need to represent the highest quality available for degree course work.

“We have had a great relationship with SSL over the past 20 years,” says Rob Jaczko, Chairman of Music Production and Engineering at Berklee. “Part of the mission here is to always train students on definitive professional equipment that they are going to encounter in commercial studios in New York, LA, London, Nashville and the world. Solid State Logic is obviously one of the principal platforms we need our students to train on, and Duality is the logical choice for our advanced studies.”

Berklee purchased its first Duality in 2010, primarily for teaching advanced mix techniques. With the expanded footprint of Berklee’s production facilities, both Duality consoles are now installed in tracking rooms (Studio B and The Bridge) and service advanced recording and mix classes and projects.

“Duality certainly represents multiple modalities and different ways to work,” continues Jaczko. “You’re not locked into a singular workflow in the room and, now that we’ve positioned both of the consoles in tracking spaces, we’re exploring the new variable harmonic front-end on the mic pres and using them in mix situations where they serve as controllers or as straightforward analogue consoles as we know them. The Duality consoles provide a lot of flexible options on how they get used, to the benefit of our students.”

“The Duality’s signal path and sound is pristine,” adds Thompson. “It offers clarity, separation, punch, extension and depth, whether used for tracking or mixing. Duality is a fine example of what happens when a quality company produces a quality product, and that is why we have two.”

Solid State Logic is the world’s leading manufacturer of analogue and digital audio consoles and provider of creative tools for music, broadcast, live and post production professionals. For more information about our award-winning products, please visit: www.solidstatelogic.com.

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PIE MAN SOUND ENSURES LONGEVITY WITH 32-CHANNEL API 1608 CONSOLE

Pie_Man_SoundCARY, NORTH CAROLINA – OCTOBER 2014: Pie Man Sound opened last month in Cary, NC, – co-owners Max and Mitch Dancik were so eager to start using their 32-channel 1608 that it’s already been used to record several local projects. Mitch said the studio is already booked solid through the year with musicians from a variety of genres anxious to record. Among others, the studio is looking forward to sessions with a young jazz/rock band working on their debut album, a quartet of Mexican classical guitarists, and a quartet of classical sax players. Mitch believes the 1608 has been a huge part of Pie Man’s early success: “My standard setup allows me to switch from record to mix mode instantly. In a ‘mix as you go’ world, this capability is critical, and a very good reason for 1608 users to consider that extra sixteen tracks.”

Pie Man was designed and built from the ground up by Wes Lachot, who told the Danciks that the 1608 would take the studio from ‘great to WOW!’ “I visited various studios,” Mitch Dancik added, “including Manifold, and my ears said it was worth it. Another important consideration was reliability and maintenance. My friend Neil Steingart was an engineer at the Record Plant in NYC and he always spoke about the indestructible API console on their mobile studio truck.” While practical elements like these helped Dancik make his decision, he said, “The most important feature is the magic that the API imparts to the sound. API is one of only a few companies keeping the best of the analog technology alive and I hope consoles like the 1608 will always be available.”

The console has not only been used on a variety of projects, but also for a wide variety of technical processes. Dancik was excited to explain how multi-faceted he has found his new gear: “The 1608 is integrated with my DAW solutions, with everything going through the API on the way in and the way out. I do hybrid mixing, with fine adjustments in the box, and broad moves on the API.” His experience with API gear is not limited to his own console, though. He attended a session with producer Joe Chiccarelli at Studio La Fabrique, “and every time he got frustrated with a piece of malfunctioning outboard gear, he’d switch to an equivalent piece of 500 series gear in an API lunchbox he had brought along. The API gear always worked as expected. I told Joe I was considering a 1608 for a new studio, and he said ‘go for it!’”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608, and THE BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

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METRIC HALO LAUNCHES DIRTY DELAY

MH_Dirty_Delay_webSAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA – OCTOBER 2014: Metric Halo is pleased to announce the immediate availability of its brand new MH Dirty Delay plug-in.

Dirty Delay is a visceral, gritty, fantastic-sounding musical feedback delay processor with integrated Character and filters in the delay path. It can create awesome vintage echo and tape-delay style sounds as well as lush and subtle spaces in a mix. New users are already finding that it is more “real” sounding than alternative in-the-box delay processors.

Not just a musical feedback delay, MH Dirty Delay is something special. With the integrated filters and Character in the feedback path you can make it clean or dirty, vintage or futuristic, subtle or nasty.

With dual delay lines, cross-feed, feedback and distortion control, Dirty Delay is capable of creating extraordinarily rich and complex textures and patterns from your audio. Dirty Delay adds texture and movement without the veiling and darkening of the sound that is often associated with other feedback delays.

Dirty Delay is equally at home in production and performance.

One License, All Formats
The license for Dirty Delay covers the Native version for VST, AU, and Pro Tools AAX on both Mac and Windows. Dirty Delay is available individually or as part of the Production Bundle. MH Dirty Delay supports both computer-based licensing and optional iLok dongle-based licensing.

A Lot of Performance, Not A Lot of Price
Dirty Delay is available from dealers or directly from http://mhlabs.com. New software licenses for Dirty Delay are available for a MSRP of $179 each, with an introductory price of only $75 each (until 10/31/2014). New Production Bundle licenses (which includes Dirty Delay) are available with a MSRP of $699, and are currently on sale for only $299 (until 10/31/2014).

A free 30-day trial of Dirty Delay is included in the Production Bundle trial and is available from https://mhsecure.com/DemoCentral/

ABOUT METRIC HALO Based on the Gulf Coast of Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with award-winning software and hardware recording, processing, metering and analysis solutions.

https://www.mhsecure.com

PANORAMIC HOUSE CELEBRATES ITS FIRST YEAR WITH GREAT OCEAN VIEWS AND AN API 1608

Baccigaluppi_PanoramicHouseWEST MARIN, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 2014: Panoramic House is a personal recording studio and vacation home owned by John Baccigaluppi and Bobby Lurie, located on the western Marin coast north of San Francisco. The duo, who own and operate studios on both the east and west coasts (The Dock in Sacramento, CA and Mavericks in NYC), renovated the historic 1960s structure, which was built entirely from recycled architectural materials salvaged from the Bay Area. Now, Panoramic House is celebrating its first year of operation with equipment relocated from Baccigaluppi’s former recording studio, The Hangar, which includes his recently-expanded API 1608.

When the five-year-old 1608 moved to Panoramic House, it was expanded to 32 channels to accommodate the studio’s 16- and 24-track analog tape decks. “With more analog tracks, we needed more console real estate,” said Baccigaluppi. “The 1608 has served me very well. I love that it has the same API circuitry that runs its large-format consoles. Eight aux sends and eight groups paired with the modular 500-series slots make it a very versatile board. We have a lot of EQ flavors, including a handful of API 550A’s, 550b’s, and 560′s.”

Baccigaluppi’s familiarity with API equipment is a contributing factor to what has made the 1608 the heart of the new studio. “Panoramic House is definitely analog-centric,” he said. “The first console I ever worked on was an API 2488 at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, and I love that the 1608 continues in that tradition. Moreover, clients are always impressed. API is a trusted name in the industry.”

Panoramic House has already been host to several big-name indie bands, including My Morning Jacket, Band of Horses, and Thee Oh Sees. With the first year behind them, Baccigaluppi and Lurie are looking forward to the fall and winter in Stinson Beach and Bolinas. “It’s funny,” Baccigaluppi said, “that most of the vacation renters come to town during the summer when it’s foggy to the point that you feel like you’re in a cloud. But that’s when people take vacations, I guess. Conveniently, most musicians are touring during the summer. The other three seasons are lovely, and that’s when most musicians want to settle in and create. Plus, that’s when the surfing is the best!”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and the BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

Websites to include:
https://www.vrbo.com/505782
http://www.singlefinstudiogroup.com/

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